Concert archive

20 concert with 헤르베르트 폰 카라얀

  • Easter@Philharmonie Festival: Episode 1

    Easter@Philharmonie Festival: Episode 1

    The Philharmonie Berlin is closed, and our Easter Festival in Baden-Baden cannot take place either. So we have come up with something for you: the digital Easter@Philharmonie Festival! The first episode is about the history of the Easter Festival, with current and historic recordings. Plus, there is chamber music, performed especially for this occasion in an empty Philharmonie. The finale is a recording of Tchaikovsky’s Fifth Symphony with Kirill Petrenko.

    04 Apr 2020

    Berliner Philharmoniker

    • free

      Easter@Philharmonie Festival: Episode 1

      Sir Simon Rattle conductor, Herbert von Karajan conductor, Claudio Abbado conductor, Kirill Petrenko conductor, Gundula Janowitz soprano, Marie-Pierre Langlamet harp, Martin Löhr cello, Albrecht Mayer oboe, Sarah Willis presenter

    Easter@Philharmonie Festival: Episode 1 Go to concert
  • Karajan conducts Beethoven’s “Missa solemnis” in Salzburg

    Karajan conducts Beethoven’s “Missa solemnis” in Salzburg

    Beethoven’s Missa solemnis is one of the most impressive sacred compositions there is, in which religious affirmation, virtuosic vocal music and a large-scale symphonic framework combine to create a powerful whole. In this live 1979 recording from Salzburg, Herbert von Karajan, who was deeply rooted in the Christian faith, realises a performance which is as emotional as it is powerful.

    13–14 Apr 1979
    From the Grosses Festspielhaus, Salzburg

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Herbert von Karajan

    • Ludwig van Beethoven
      Missa solemnis in D major, op. 123

      Anna Tomowa-Sintow Soprano, Ruza Baldani Alto, Eric Tappy Tenor, José van Dam Bass, Vienna Singverein, Helmuth Froschauer Chorus Master

    Karajan conducts Beethoven’s “Missa solemnis” in Salzburg Go to concert
  • Karajan conducts the 1978 New Year’s Eve Concert

    Karajan conducts the 1978 New Year’s Eve Concert

    We normally think of Herbert von Karajan as an awe-inspiring maestro of the great Classical works. This festive, virtuoso New Year’s Eve Concert from 1978, which includes excerpts from Georges Bizet’s L’Arlésienne suites, Franz Liszt’s Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2, plus music by Giuseppe Verdi, Hector Berlioz, Pietro Mascagni and Franz von Suppé, demonstrates his passion and precision in popular highlights, too.

    31 Dec 1978
    New Year’s Eve Concert

    Herbert von Karajan

    • Giuseppe Verdi
      La forza del destino: Overture

    • Georges Bizet
      L’Arlésienne, Suite No. 2: Excerpts

    • Franz Liszt
      Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2

    • Hector Berlioz
      La Damnation de Faust, Dramatic Legend, op. 24: Rákóczi March

    • Pietro Mascagni
      L’amico Fritz: Intermezzo

    • Franz von Suppé
      Leichte Kavallerie: Overture

    Karajan conducts the 1978 New Year’s Eve Concert Go to concert
  • Karajan conducts Brahms’s “German Requiem” in Salzburg

    Karajan conducts Brahms’s “German Requiem” in Salzburg

    We now show a live recording of Brahms’s Deutsches Requiem from the 1978 Salzburg Festival with Herbert von Karajan conducting and Gundula Janowitz and José van Dam as the soloists. A work full of consolation and warmth, Karajan’s expansive interpretation highlights its grand arcs. In addition to the Berliner Philharmoniker, the performers include the Wiener Singverein which was once conducted by Brahms himself.

    24 Mar 1978
    From the Grosses Festspielhaus, Salzburg

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Herbert von Karajan

    Gundula Janowitz, José van Dam

    • Johannes Brahms
      A German Requiem, op. 45

      Gundula Janowitz Soprano, José van Dam Bass, Helmuth Froschauer Chorus Master, Vienna Singverein

    Karajan conducts Brahms’s “German Requiem” in Salzburg Go to concert
  • Karajan conducts Ravel and Debussy

    Karajan conducts Ravel and Debussy

    Herbert von Karajan was a master of the fine blending of acoustic colours. This quality is shown to its best advantage in this programme of masterpieces of French Impressionism. Works include Debussy’s multifaceted La Mer, and his lascivious, dream-like Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune, and Ravel’s Suite No. 2 from Daphnis et Chloé, a work which combines shimmering transience with uncompromising energy.

    14–15 Feb 1978

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Herbert von Karajan

    • Claude Debussy
      Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune

    • Claude Debussy
      La Mer, trois esquisses symphoniques for orchestra

    • Maurice Ravel
      Daphnis et Chloé, Suite No. 2

    Karajan conducts Ravel and Debussy Go to concert
  • Karajan conducts Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony at the 1977 New Year’s Eve Concert

    Karajan conducts Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony at the 1977 New Year’s Eve Concert

    This recording from New Year’s Eve 1977 holds a special place among the many Karajan made of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony – not only because of the inspired performance, but also as it was the first occasion a Berliner Philharmoniker concert was broadcast on TV around the world. At the same time, this is one of the few video productions of Karajan which was recorded under completely live conditions.

    31 Dec 1977
    New Year’s Eve Concert

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Herbert von Karajan

    • Ludwig van Beethoven
      Symphony No. 9 in D minor, op. 125 “Choral”

      Anna Tomowa-Sintow Soprano, José van Dam Bass, Agnes Baltsa Contralto, René Kollo Tenor, Chorus of Deutsche Oper Berlin, Walter Hagen-Groll Chorus Master

    Karajan conducts Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony at the 1977 New Year’s Eve Concert Go to concert
  • Karajan conducts Beethoven, Weber, Rossini and Wagner

    Karajan conducts Beethoven, Weber, Rossini and Wagner

    Herbert von Karajan laid the foundation of his career as an opera conductor. His fine dramatic instinct manifests itself impressively in this programme recorded in 1975 with overtures to stage works by Ludwig van Beethoven, Carl Maria von Weber, Gioacchino Rossini and Richard Wagner, which often – such as in the case of the preludes to Tannhäuser and Der Freischütz – come across like condensed versions of the respective full works.

    21–22 Jan 1975

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Herbert von Karajan

    • Ludwig van Beethoven
      Egmont, op. 84: Overture

    • Ludwig van Beethoven
      Coriolan, overture, op. 62

    • Carl Maria von Weber
      Der Freischütz, op. 77: Overture

    • Gioacchino Rossini
      Guillaume Tell: Overture

    • Richard Wagner
      Tannhäuser: Overture

    Karajan conducts Beethoven, Weber, Rossini and Wagner Go to concert
  • Herbert von Karajan and Mstislav Rostropovich with Strauss’s “Don Quixote”

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    Herbert von Karajan was a great admirer of Richard Strauss and is still considered an outstanding interpreter of his music. With Karajan, the tonal splendour and virtuosity of the orchestration was in the best of hands, especially in Strauss’ tone poem Don Quixote which he held in particular high regard. In this famous recording from 1975, the solo cello, which represents the eponymous hero, is played by Mstislav Rostropovich.

    01–31 Jan 1975

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Herbert von Karajan

    Ulrich Koch, Mstislav Rostropovich

    • Richard Strauss
      Don Quixote, Fantastic Variations on a Theme of Knightly Character, op. 35

      Ulrich Koch Viola, Mstislav Rostropovich Cello

    Herbert von Karajan and Mstislav Rostropovich with Strauss’s “Don Quixote” Go to concert
  • Karajan conducts Tchaikovsky’s Symphonies Nos. 4–6

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    Hardly any other composer bequeathed a legacy of such uninhibitedly emotional music as did Peter Tchaikovsky, who brilliantly fused personal experience and suffering with superb compositional art. It is evident that Herbert von Karajan, master of voluptuous sound and emphasis, was an ideal Tchaikovsky interpreter. In these recordings from 1973 he conducts the last three symphonies, including the famous Pathétique.

    01–31 Dec 1973

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Herbert von Karajan

    • Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
      Symphony No. 4 in F minor, op. 36

    • Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
      Symphony No. 5 in E minor, op. 64

    • Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
      Symphony No. 6 in B minor, op. 74 “Pathétique”

    Karajan conducts Tchaikovsky’s Symphonies Nos. 4–6 Go to concert
  • Karajan conducts Brahms’s Symphonies Nos. 1–4

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    Brahms’s symphonies were among the cornerstones of Herbert von Karajan’s repertoire – and his compositions have also played a more important role in the work of the Berliner Philharmoniker than almost any other composer’s. So when it came to this music, the partnership between orchestra and conductor was a particularly happy one, as these 1978 recordings of all four Brahms symphonies show: performances full of passion and dark fire.

    02–03 Jan 1973

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Herbert von Karajan

    • Johannes Brahms
      Symphony No. 1 in C minor, op. 68

    • Johannes Brahms
      Symphony No. 2 in D major, op. 73

    • Johannes Brahms
      Symphony No. 3 in F major, op. 90

    • Johannes Brahms
      Symphony No. 4 in E minor, op. 98

    Karajan conducts Brahms’s Symphonies Nos. 1–4 Go to concert
  • Karajan conducts Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5

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    “Throw away your first hundred Fifths!” Karajan would tell younger conductors, such are the challenges of this Beethoven symphony. In this recording from 1972, we experience on the other hand a definitive interpretation. The orchestral sound combines the velvety opulence typical of his predecessors with the brilliance and power Karajan brought to the Berlin tradition.

    28–29 Feb 1972

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Herbert von Karajan

    • Ludwig van Beethoven
      Symphony No. 5 in C minor, op. 67

    Karajan conducts Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5 Go to concert
  • Karajan conducts Beethoven’s Symphonies Nos. 1 & 4

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    Herbert von Karajan devotes himself with seriousness and commitment to Ludwig van Beethoven’s often underrated Symphonies Nos. 1 and 4. In the First, he puts the young, revolutionary Beethoven in the foreground, while in the Fourth, he brings out the lyrical charm and the perfect balance of the music. Both performances are from 1971 with the First Symphony documented in a studio recording with a very individual visual aesthetic.

    27–31 Dec 1971

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Herbert von Karajan

    • Ludwig van Beethoven
      Symphony No. 1 in C major, op. 21

    • Ludwig van Beethoven
      Symphony No. 4 in B flat major, op. 60

    Karajan conducts Beethoven’s Symphonies Nos. 1 & 4 Go to concert
  • Recommendation: Karajan conducts Beethoven’s Symphonies Nos. 2 & 8

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    For many years, Beethoven’s Second and Eighth symphonies were regarded as more minor works in the cycle of the nine symphonies. Due in no small part to Karajan’s decisive, clearly structured interpretations with the Berliner Philharmoniker made in the 1960s, the importance of these symphonies in Beethoven’s œuvre was clearly demonstrated. The present performances from 1971 were documented as studio recordings.

    08–17 Nov 1971

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Herbert von Karajan

    • Ludwig van Beethoven
      Symphony No. 8 in F major, op. 93

    • Ludwig van Beethoven
      Symphony No. 2 in D major, op. 36

    Recommendation: Karajan conducts Beethoven’s Symphonies Nos. 2 & 8 Go to concert
  • Karajan conducts Beethoven’s Symphonies Nos. 3 & 7

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    With his Third Symphony, the Eroica, Ludwig van Beethoven presents himself for the first time as a Titan who fearlessly faces his fate. Herbert von Karajan and the Berliner Philharmoniker are equally gripping in their interpretation, which was documented by director Hugo Niebeling with an intriguing visual concept. Beethoven's Seventh is presented here in the same format.

    18–21 Oct 1971

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Herbert von Karajan

    • Ludwig van Beethoven
      Symphony No. 3 in E flat major, op. 55 “Eroica”

    • Ludwig van Beethoven
      Symphony No. 7 in A major, op. 92

    Karajan conducts Beethoven’s Symphonies Nos. 3 & 7 Go to concert
  • Karajan conducts Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony

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    Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, the Berliner Philharmoniker and Herbert von Karajan: A triad which is virtually the epitome of classical music. The present performance is based on concerts given in the Berlin Philharmonie on New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day 1968 with the soloists Gundula Janowitz, Christa Ludwig, Jess Thomas and Walter Berry. In this, his first video recording of the symphony, Karajan also makes his debut as a film director.

    02–03 Feb 1968

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Herbert von Karajan

    Christa Ludwig, Gundula Janowitz, Walter Berry, Jess Thomas

    • Ludwig van Beethoven
      Symphony No. 9 in D minor, op. 125 “Choral”

      Christa Ludwig Contralto, Gundula Janowitz Soprano, Walter Berry Bass, Jess Thomas Tenor, Walter Hagen-Groll Chorus Master, Chorus of Deutsche Oper Berlin

    • free

      Interview
      Sir Simon Rattle about Herbert von Karajan

    Karajan conducts Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony Go to concert
  • Karajan conducts Beethoven’s Sixth Symphony

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    The emotional and real storms in Beethoven’s Pastoral are vividly expressed in this rousing performance from 1967 with the Berliner Philharmoniker and Herbert von Karajan. These are intensified all the more by the award-winning avant-garde director Hugo Niebeling’s innovate and often expressionistic film concept: an experiment whose aesthetic boldness impresses to this day.

    23 Oct 1967

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Herbert von Karajan

    • Ludwig van Beethoven
      Symphony No. 6 in F major, op.68 “Pastoral”

    Karajan conducts Beethoven’s Sixth Symphony Go to concert
  • Karajan conducts Bach

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    Although Herbert von Karajan was a great admirer of Bach, his interpretations of the composer’s music were rarely recorded on video. Here we present two of these productions with the Third Brandenburg Concerto and the Orchestral Suite No. 2, which Karajan conducts from the harpsichord. The soloist in the Suite is Karlheinz Zöller, who was principal flautist with the Philharmoniker for many years. The recordings were made in Paris in 1967/68.

    1967–1968
    From the Salle Pleyel, Paris

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Herbert von Karajan

    • Johann Sebastian Bach
      Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 in G major, BWV 1048

      Herbert von Karajan

    • Johann Sebastian Bach
      Orchestral Suite No. 2 in B minor, BWV 1067

      Herbert von Karajan

    Karajan conducts Bach Go to concert
  • Karajan and Weissenberg perform Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninov

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    “If anyone can follow me, then it is Alexis Weissenberg” – Vladimir Horowitz is reported to have once said. Herbert von Karajan also had a high opinion of the Bulgarian pianist whose full sound approached his own aesthetic. Together, they realised many joint projects, including this recording of Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s First Piano Concerto and Sergei Rachmaninov’s Second Piano Concerto.

    1967–1971

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Herbert von Karajan

    Alexis Weissenberg

    • Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
      Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 1 in B flat minor, op. 23

      Alexis Weissenberg Piano

    • Sergei Rachmaninov
      Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 2 in C minor, op. 18

      Alexis Weissenberg Piano

    Karajan and Weissenberg perform Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninov Go to concert
  • Performances and conversation: Karajan conducts Dvořák’s Symphony No. 9

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    In Antonín Dvořák’s Symphony From the New World, Herbert von Karajan and the Berliner Philharmoniker were able to show the whole of their vast range of tonal colours. In this black and white documentary film from 1966, directed by Henri-Georges Clouzot, Karajan appears not only as the conductor but also discusses his personal view of Dvořák’s most popular work in interview.

    02 Jan 1966

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Herbert von Karajan

    • Antonín Dvořák
      Symphony No. 9 in E minor, op. 95 “From the New World”

    • Herbert von Karajan in conversation with Denis Stevens

      Herbert von Karajan, Denis Stevens

    Performances and conversation: Karajan conducts Dvořák’s Symphony No. 9 Go to concert
  • Conversation, master class and performance: Karajan conducts Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5

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    In this film, director Henri-Georges Clouzot provides a fascinating insight into the working methods of Herbert von Karajan – including the secret of the legendary “Karajan sound”. We experience the conductor not only in a performance of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony, but also in a master class in which he passes on his vast knowledge of rehearsal technique and musical interpretation.

    Jan–Dec 1966

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Herbert von Karajan

    • Ludwig van Beethoven
      Symphony No. 5 in C minor, op. 67

    • Symphony No. 5 in C minor, op. 67 (rehearsal and conversation)

      Herbert von Karajan

    Conversation, master class and performance: Karajan conducts Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5 Go to concert