Live concerts

  • Alain Altinoglu debuts with the Berliner Philharmoniker

    Alain Altinoglu debuts with the Berliner Philharmoniker

    The transition to Modernism is one of the most exciting phases in musical history. In this concert, works by Maurice Ravel, Béla Bartók, Claude Debussy and Albert Roussel reveal the richness of late Romanticism combined with originality and pioneering spirit. Alain Altinoglu, the “sensitive magician of timbre” (Süddeutsche Zeitung), makes his debut conducting the Berliner Philharmoniker with Máté Szűcs as the soloist in Bartók’s Viola Concerto.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Alain Altinoglu

    Máté Szűcs

    • Maurice Ravel
      Rhapsodie espagnole

    • Béla Bartók
      Concerto for Viola and Orchestra, Sz 120 (Restoration and Orchestration by Csaba Erdélyi, 2016 European Première)

      Máté Szűcs viola

    • Claude Debussy
      Suite from Pelléas et Mélisande arranged in form of a suite by Alain Altinoglu Première

    • Albert Roussel
      Bacchus et Ariane, Orchestral Suite No. 2

    Alain Altinoglu debuts with the Berliner Philharmoniker Go to concert
  • Daniele Gatti conducts Hindemith and Brahms

    Daniele Gatti conducts Hindemith and Brahms

    In the 19th century, many regarded the symphony as obsolete. However, the genre continued to be impressively alive, as Daniele Gatti, chief conductor of the Concertgebouw Orchestra Amsterdam, demonstrates in this concert. The programme includes Johannes Brahms’s lyrically melodious yet highly innovative Second Symphony and Paul Hindemith’s symphony Mathis der Maler, a sumptuous-sounding play on Baroque forms.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Daniele Gatti

    • Paul Hindemith
      Symphony: Mathis der Maler

    • Johannes Brahms
      Symphony No. 2 in D major, op. 73

    Daniele Gatti conducts Hindemith and Brahms Go to concert
  • Simon Rattle with Mitsuko Uchida and Amihai Grosz

    Simon Rattle with Mitsuko Uchida and Amihai Grosz

    Delicate melancholy and lyrical sensuousness characterise the two solo concertos on this programme with Simon Rattle, Mitsuko Uchida and Amihai Grosz. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart seems to reflect on his life in his last piano concerto, while William Walton’s Viola Concerto is dominated by the dark tone of the solo instrument. As a counterpoint, the concert closes with Zoltán Kodály’s humorously grotesque Háry János Suite.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Sir Simon Rattle

    Mitsuko Uchida, Amihai Grosz

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      Concerto for Piano and Orchestra in B flat major, K. 595

      Mitsuko Uchida piano

    • William Walton
      Concerto for Viola and Orchestra (Revised Version from 1962)

      Amihai Grosz viola

    • Zoltán Kodály
      Háry János Suite

    Simon Rattle with Mitsuko Uchida and Amihai Grosz Go to concert
  • Simon Rattle conducts Janáček’s “The Cunning Little Vixen”

    Simon Rattle conducts Janáček’s “The Cunning Little Vixen”

    The hero in Leoš Janáček’s opera The Cunning Little Vixen is not a princess or a knight but an animal of the forest. This is a unique piece of music theatre in other respects as well, such as its magically luminous music, its poetry and its comedy. Simon Rattle presents the work together with star director Peter Sellars, with whom he has already realised many exciting projects, including their acclaimed interpretations of Bach’s Passions.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Sir Simon Rattle

    Gerald Finley, Angela Denoke, Lucy Crowe

    • Leoš Janáček
      Příhody lišky Bystroušky (The Cunning Little Vixen)

      Gerald Finley bass baritone, Pauline Malefane contralto, Burkhard Ulrich tenor, Hanno Müller-Brachmann baritone, Angela Denoke soprano, Lucy Crowe soprano, Sir Willard White bass, Anna Lapkovskaja mezzo-soprano, Vocalconsort Berlin, David Cavelius chorus master, Vocal Heroes Children's Choirs, Peter Sellars stage direction

    Simon Rattle conducts Janáček’s “The Cunning Little Vixen” Go to concert
  • Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts Brahms’s “Ein deutsches Requiem”

    Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts Brahms’s “Ein deutsches Requiem”

    Brahms’s Ein deutsches Requiem is a powerful, solemn work, yet its message shows the utmost compassion. While the horrors of the last judgement are the focus in traditional requiem settings, Brahms’s work sings sensitively of sorrow and consolation in the face of death. The conductor of this performance is Yannick Nézet-Séguin, music director of the Philadelphia Orchestra and music director designate of the Met in New York.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Yannick Nézet-Séguin

    Rundfunkchor Berlin

    • Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach
      Heilig, Cantata for solo contralto, 2 mixed choirs and 2 orchestras, Wq 217

      Wiebke Lehmkuhl contralto, Rundfunkchor Berlin, Gijs Leenaars chorus master

    • Johannes Brahms
      Ein deutsches Requiem, op. 45

      Hanna-Elisabeth Müller soprano, Markus Werba baritone, Rundfunkchor Berlin, Gijs Leenaars chorus master

    Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts Brahms’s “Ein deutsches Requiem” Go to concert
  • Ton Koopman conducts Bach’s Mass in B Minor

    Ton Koopman conducts Bach’s Mass in B Minor

    The B minor Mass is Johann Sebastian Bach’s legacy to vocal music: a cosmos of all the forms and styles that make his sacred works so rich. There are arias of dance-like lightness as well as austere Renaissance singing, ingeniously constructed fugues and jubilant choruses. In this concert the work is performed under the baton of Ton Koopman, a conductor, organist and harpsichordist who is one of the great Bach interpreters of our time.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Ton Koopman

    RIAS Kammerchor

    • Johann Sebastian Bach
      Mass in B minor, BWV 232

      Lenneke Ruiten soprano, Wiebke Lehmkuhl contralto, Tilman Lichdi tenor, Klaus Mertens bass, RIAS Kammerchor, Justin Doyle chorus master

    Ton Koopman conducts Bach’s Mass in B Minor Go to concert
  • Simon Rattle conducts Stravinsky’s “Petrushka”

    Simon Rattle conducts Stravinsky’s “Petrushka”

    Performances of Stravinsky have been among the highlights of the Rattle era with the Berliner Philharmoniker. In this concert Sir Simon presents the ballet Petrushka. This tragic love story of a puppet brought to life combines the nostalgic atmosphere of a Russian fair with an innovative musical language. Rachmaninov’s late-Romantically tinged Third Symphony and the premiere of a short work by Unsuk Chin complete the programme.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Sir Simon Rattle

    • Igor Stravinsky
      Petrushka (revised Version from 1947)

    • Unsuk Chin
      New Work commissioned by the Berliner Philharmoniker Foundation Première

      Berliner Philharmoniker

    • Sergei Rachmaninov
      Symphony No. 3 in A minor, op. 44

    Simon Rattle conducts Stravinsky’s “Petrushka” Go to concert
  • An invitation from the Vocal Heroes: Singalong Christmas concert

    An invitation from the Vocal Heroes: Singalong Christmas concert

    There is a sure recipe for getting into the Christmas spirit: singing together! You have an opportunity to do just that with this invitation from the Vocal Heroes choirs of our Education Programme to the great Christmas singalong concert in the Berlin Philharmonie. Under the direction of Simon Halsey, Berlin school children present Christmas songs from all over the world – and look forward to your vocal support.

    •  

    Members of the Berliner Philharmoniker

    • Vocal Heroes Sing-Along Concert for Advent

      Vocal Heroes Children's Choirs

    Concert details will be available soon.

  • Bernard Haitink conducts Mahler’s Ninth Symphony

    Bernard Haitink conducts Mahler’s Ninth Symphony

    It is almost inconceivable today that Gustav Mahler’s works were long marginalised in musical life. Bernard Haitink, who has an exceptionally fine feel for the fragmented nature of this music, is one of the conductors who brought about the Mahler renaissance in the 1960s. Mahler, says Haitink, “has always troubled me because he doesn’t validate you”. In this concert, he conducts Mahler’s farewell to the world, the Ninth Symphony.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Bernard Haitink

    • Gustav Mahler
      Symphony No. 9

    Bernard Haitink conducts Mahler’s Ninth Symphony Go to concert
  • Herbert Blomstedt and Maria João Pires perform Mozart

    Herbert Blomstedt and Maria João Pires perform Mozart

    Anton Bruckner’s Third Symphony has the same organ-like power as his later works – but is still overshadowed by them. Bruckner himself was never entirely satisfied with the symphony and revised it several times. This concert conducted by Herbert Blomstedt offers a rare opportunity to discover the first version. Maria João Pires, famous for her sensitive touch, opens the programme with Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 23.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Herbert Blomstedt

    Maria João Pires

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 23 in A major, K. 488

      Maria João Pires piano

    • Anton Bruckner
      Symphony No. 3 in D minor (1st Version from 1873)

    Herbert Blomstedt and Maria João Pires perform Mozart Go to concert
  • A “Late Night” concert with French chamber music and Simon Rattle at the piano

    A “Late Night” concert with French chamber music and Simon Rattle at the piano

    The two French chamber music works of this Late Night concert show evidence of existential crises – but without sacrificing elegance. Olivier Messiaen wrote his Quatuor pour la fin du temps in 1940/41 in a German prisoner-of-war camp, surrounded by death. Claude Debussy composed his violin sonata in 1917, while he was seriously ill. Members of the Berliner Philharmoniker perform with Sir Simon Rattle at the piano.

    •  

    Sir Simon Rattle, Daishin Kashimoto, Ludwig Quandt, Wenzel Fuchs

    • Claude Debussy
      Sonata for Violin and Piano

      Sir Simon Rattle piano, Daishin Kashimoto violin

    • Olivier Messiaen
      Quatuor pour la fin du temps

      Sir Simon Rattle piano, Daishin Kashimoto violin, Ludwig Quandt cello, Wenzel Fuchs clarinet

    Concert details will be available soon.

  • Christian Thielemann conducts Beethoven’s “Missa solemnis”

    Christian Thielemann conducts Beethoven’s “Missa solemnis”

    Ludwig van Beethoven regarded the Missa solemnis as “the best of his sacred works”. In this complex work, magnificent praise to God is as important as the gentle humanist message. On top of this there is the driving energy that we know from Beethoven’s symphonies. The concert is conducted by Christian Thielemann, who has given impressive performances of many great choral works with the Berliner Philharmoniker.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Christian Thielemann

    Rundfunkchor Berlin

    • Ludwig van Beethoven
      Missa solemnis in D major, op. 123

      Genia Kühmeier soprano, Elisabeth Kulman mezzo-soprano, Daniel Behle tenor, Franz-Josef Selig bass, Rundfunkchor Berlin, Philipp Ahmann chorus master

    Christian Thielemann conducts Beethoven’s “Missa solemnis” Go to concert
  • Iván Fischer and Vilde Frang present Bartók’s Violin Concerto No. 1

    Iván Fischer and Vilde Frang present Bartók’s Violin Concerto No. 1

    An unhappy love affair inspired Béla Bartók’s Violin Concerto No. 1, which is characterised by extraordinary tenderness and emotional depth. The soloist is Vilde Frang, who made her debut with the Philharmoniker at the 2016 European Concert and impressed the audience with her passionate, singing tone. Conductor Iván Fischer also presents excerpts from Mendelssohn’s magical, gossamer-light music for A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Iván Fischer

    Vilde Frang

    • Béla Bartók
      Hungarian Peasant Songs for Orchestra, Sz 100

    • Béla Bartók
      Concerto for Violin and Orchestra No. 1, Sz 36

      Vilde Frang violin

    • Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy
      A Midsummer Night’s Dream, op. 61 (Excerpts, arranged in form of a suite by Iván Fischer)

      Mari Eriksmoen soprano, Kitty Whately mezzo-soprano, Ladies of the Philharmonia Choir Wien, Walter Zeh chorus master

    Iván Fischer and Vilde Frang present Bartók’s Violin Concerto No. 1 Go to concert
  • New Year’s Eve Concert with Simon Rattle and Joyce DiDonato

    New Year’s Eve Concert with Simon Rattle and Joyce DiDonato

    With her flexible, slender but darkly timbred mezzo-soprano, Joyce DiDonato has already delighted audiences at the Philharmonie on several occasions. Now she is the star guest at Sir Simon Rattle’s side during the New Year’s Eve Concert, singing Richard Strauss’s lavishly beautiful orchestral songs. The programme also includes works by Dvořák, Stravinsky, Bernstein and Shostakovich – full of virtuosity, gracefulness and humour.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Sir Simon Rattle

    Joyce DiDonato

    • Antonín Dvořák
      Carnival Overture, op. 92

    • Igor Stravinsky
      Pas de deux from Apollon musagète

    • Richard Strauss
      Orchestral Songs

      Joyce DiDonato mezzo-soprano

    • Leonard Bernstein
      3 Dance Episodes from On the Town

    • Leonard Bernstein
      Take Care of this House

      Joyce DiDonato mezzo-soprano

    • Dmitri Shostakovich
      Suite from The Golden Age, op. 22a

    New Year’s Eve Concert with Simon Rattle and Joyce DiDonato Go to concert
  • Antonio Pappano and Véronique Gens

    Antonio Pappano and Véronique Gens

    Sir Antonio Pappano, music director of London’s Royal Opera House and the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia in Rome, returns to the Berliner Philharmoniker after a 12-year absence. He presents a colourful programme that contrasts delicate French music by Ravel and Duparc with the brutal power of Russian works by Mussorgsky and Scriabin. The vocal soloist is Véronique Gens.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Antonio Pappano

    Véronique Gens

    • Maurice Ravel
      Une barque sur l'Océan (Orchesterfassung)

    • Maurice Ravel
      Alborada del gracioso

    • Henri Duparc
      L'Invitation au voyage (Version for Orchestra)

      Véronique Gens soprano

    • Henri Duparc
      Romance de Mignon (Version for Orchestra)

      Véronique Gens soprano

    • Henri Duparc
      Chanson triste (Version for Orchestra)

      Véronique Gens soprano

    • Henri Duparc
      Au Pays où se fait la guerre (Version for Orchestra)

      Véronique Gens soprano

    • Henri Duparc
      Lamento (Version for Orchestra)

      Véronique Gens soprano

    • Modest Mussorgsky
      St. John’s Night on the Bare Mountain (Original Version from 1867)

    • Alexander Skrjabin
      Poème de l’extase, Symphonic Poem, op. 54

    Antonio Pappano and Véronique Gens Go to concert
  • Seiji Ozawa conducts Ravel’s “L’Enfant et les sortilèges”

    Seiji Ozawa conducts Ravel’s “L’Enfant et les sortilèges”

    Appearances by Seiji Ozawa, honorary member of the Berliner Philharmoniker, have been a rarity in recent years – making it an even greater pleasure that he is conducting the second half of this concert. The programme features a work of imagination, charm and humour: Maurice Ravel’s short opera L’Enfant et les sortilèges. The first part of the concert centres around 1st concertmaster Noah Bendix-Balgley, who plays works by Mozart and Saint-Saëns.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Seiji Ozawa

    Noah Bendix-Balgley, Emily Fons

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      Concerto for Violin and Orchestra No. 5 in A major, K. 219

      Noah Bendix-Balgley violin

    • Camille Saint-Saëns
      Introduction and Rondo capriccioso for violin and orchestra in A minor, op. 28

      Noah Bendix-Balgley violin

    • Maurice Ravel
      L’Enfant et les sortilèges (The Child and the Spells) Scenic Performance

      Emily Fons mezzo-soprano, Sir Paul Gay bass baritone, Yvonne Naef contralto, Kiera Duffy soprano, Marie Lenormand mezzo-soprano, Mathias Vidal tenor, Elliot Madore baritone, Kanae Fujitani soprano, Rundfunkchor Berlin, Gijs Leenaars chorus master, David Kneuss stage direction

    Seiji Ozawa conducts Ravel’s “L’Enfant et les sortilèges” Go to concert
  • Mariss Jansons and Daniil Trifonov with Schumann’s Piano Concerto

    Mariss Jansons and Daniil Trifonov with Schumann’s Piano Concerto

    In this concert, Mariss Jansons, a celebrated interpreter of the Romantic repertoire, reveals the entire musical and emotional range of this epoch. On the one hand, the wild virtuosity of Schumann’s rapturous Piano Concerto, on the other, the deeply religious grandeur of Bruckner’s Sixth Symphony. The piano soloist is Daniil Trifonov, who combines sensational technique with sensitivity and maturity of expression.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Mariss Jansons

    Daniil Trifonov

    • Robert Schumann
      Concerto for Piano and Orchestra in A minor, op. 54

      Daniil Trifonov piano

    • Anton Bruckner
      Symphony No. 6 in A major

    Mariss Jansons and Daniil Trifonov with Schumann’s Piano Concerto Go to concert
  • Dima Slobodeniouk and Baiba Skride

    Dima Slobodeniouk and Baiba Skride

    This programme of music from north-eastern Europe is wonderfully austere, at times melancholy, at times brutal. We hear the mythical sounds of Jean Sibelius’s tone poem Tapiola, the industrial power of Sergei Prokofiev’s Second Symphony and Dmitri Shostakovich’s Second Violin Concerto, which alternates between passion and disenchanted sadness. Dima Slobodeniouk makes his conducting debut with the orchestra; the violin soloist is Baiba Skride.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Dima Slobodeniouk

    Baiba Skride

    • Jean Sibelius
      Tapiola, Symphonic Poem, op. 112

    • Dmitri Shostakovich
      Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in C sharp minor, op. 129

      Baiba Skride violin

    • Sergei Prokofiev
      Symphony No. 2 in D minor, op. 40

    Dima Slobodeniouk and Baiba Skride Go to concert
  • Zubin Mehta and Leonidas Kavakos

    Zubin Mehta and Leonidas Kavakos

    Dark tones in every shade dominate this concert with Zubin Mehta and Leonidas Kavakos. For example, Alban Berg’s Violin Concerto, written in memory of the 19-year-old Manon Gropius, is one of the most poignant works of Modernism. Anton Webern’s delicate Passacaglia was written with the death of the composer’s own mother still fresh in his mind. Antonín Dvořák’s Seventh Symphony is also unusually acerbic and demonic.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Zubin Mehta

    Leonidas Kavakos

    • Anton Webern
      Passacaglia, op. 1

    • Alban Berg
      Concerto for Violin and Orchestra “To the Memory of an Angel”

      Leonidas Kavakos violin

    • Antonín Dvořák
      Symphony No. 7 in D minor, op. 70

    Zubin Mehta and Leonidas Kavakos Go to concert
  • “Late Night” concert: Paul Whiteman’s greatest hits

    “Late Night” concert: Paul Whiteman’s greatest hits

    To this day Paul Whiteman is regarded as the “King of Jazz”. With his fabulous orchestra and ingenious arrangements, he ensured that jazz became respectable and found its way into high culture from the 1920s onwards. Simon Rattle has long had a weakness for Whiteman’s unmistakable sound and brings it to life again in this Late Night concert: a wonderful journey into the world of symphonic jazz.

    •  

    Members of the Berliner Philharmoniker
    Sir Simon Rattle

    • Paul Whiteman
      Paul Whiteman and his Orchestra – The Greatest Hits: Arrangements of Makin’ Whopee, Dardanella, My Blue Heaven, San, Sweet Sue, After You’ve Gone and other Songs

    Concert details will be available soon.

  • Zubin Mehta and Michael Barenboim

    Zubin Mehta and Michael Barenboim

    Schoenberg’s Violin Concerto demands everything from the soloist: tremendous interval leaps, awkward fingerings, breakneck tempos and richly nuanced expressiveness. Michael Barenboim presents all of this in his debut with the Philharmoniker. Zubin Mehta also conducts two colourful works in which Ravel adapts the cultural heritage of other European countries: the Viennese Waltz in La Valse and an ancient love story in Daphnis et Chloé.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Zubin Mehta

    Michael Barenboim

    • Franz Schubert
      Overture of the Incidental Music to Rosamunde, D 797

    • Arnold Schoenberg
      Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, op. 36

      Michael Barenboim violin

    • Maurice Ravel
      La Valse

    • Maurice Ravel
      Daphnis et Chloé, Suite No. 2

    Zubin Mehta and Michael Barenboim Go to concert
  • Simon Rattle and Daniel Barenboim with Bartók’s Piano Concerto No. 1

    Simon Rattle and Daniel Barenboim with Bartók’s Piano Concerto No. 1

    In 1964, Daniel Barenboim made his acclaimed debut with the Berliner Philharmoniker playing Bartók’s Piano Concerto No. 1. Now, with Simon Rattle as conductor, he again devotes himself to this fascinating piece in which the piano is featured as an unrelenting percussion instrument. The other works on the programme are also marked by energetic urgency: Janáček’s Sinfonietta with its striking fanfares and Dvořák’s Slavonic Dances.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Sir Simon Rattle

    Daniel Barenboim

    • Antonín Dvořák
      Slavonic Dances, op. 72

    • Béla Bartók
      Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 1, Sz 83

      Daniel Barenboim piano

    • Leoš Janáček
      Sinfonietta, op. 60

    Simon Rattle and Daniel Barenboim with Bartók’s Piano Concerto No. 1 Go to concert
  • Daniel Harding conducts “An Alpine Symphony”

    Daniel Harding conducts “An Alpine Symphony”

    Richard Strauss was not only a master of orchestration but an enthusiastic mountaineer as well. Thus, it is not surprising that in his last symphonic poem he depicted a hike in the Alps – vivid and haunting, with an endless palette of tonal colours. Conductor Daniel Harding and bass-baritone Gerald Finley also present familiar Schubert songs in rarely heard orchestral arrangements by Brahms and Reger.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Daniel Harding

    Gerald Finley

    • Franz Schubert
      „Wo bin ich?” – “O könnt’ ich, Allgewaltiger”, Recitative and Aria from Lazarus, oder: Die Feier der Auferstehung, D 689

      Gerald Finley bass baritone

    • Franz Schubert
      Prometheus, D 674 (orch. by Max Reger)

      Gerald Finley bass baritone

    • Franz Schubert
      Erlkönig, D 328 (orch. by Max Reger)

      Gerald Finley bass baritone

    • Franz Schubert
      Memnon, D 541 (orch. by Johannes Brahms)

      Gerald Finley bass baritone

    • Franz Schubert
      An Schwager Kronos, D 369 (orch. by Johannes Brahms)

      Gerald Finley bass baritone

    • Franz Schubert
      An die Musik, D 547 (orch. by Max Reger)

      Gerald Finley bass baritone

    • Richard Strauss
      Eine Alpensinfonie (An Alpine Symphony), op. 64

    Daniel Harding conducts “An Alpine Symphony” Go to concert
  • The Waseda Symphony Orchestra Tokyo plays Strauss and Tchaikovsky

    The Waseda Symphony Orchestra Tokyo plays Strauss and Tchaikovsky

    The outstanding orchestra of Tokyo’s Waseda University has long enjoyed a close relationship with the Berliner Philharmoniker. Its trademarks are amazing rhythmic precision and the Taiko drummers, who conclude every concert with a virtuoso drum piece. The main work on this programme demonstrates that the orchestra also has a passion for sumptuous, highly demanding scores: Richard Strauss’s Sinfonia domestica.

    •  

    Waseda Symphony Orchestra Tokyo
    Masahiko Tanaka

    • Otto Nicolai
      Overture to Die lustigen Weiber von Windsor (The Merry Wives of Windsor)

    • Richard Strauss
      Sinfonia domestica, op. 53

    • Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
      Romeo and Juliet

    • Maki Ishii
      Mono-Prism for Japanese drums and orchestra, op. 29

    Concert details will be available soon.

  • The Junge Deutsche Philharmonie with David Afkham and Steven Isserlis

    The Junge Deutsche Philharmonie with David Afkham and Steven Isserlis

    The Junge Deutsche Philharmonie and conductor David Afkham present a marvellous French programme. In addition to Berlioz’s famous Symphonie fantastique, the musicians – all German conservatory students – play two less familiar gems: Messiaen’s meditative Les Offrandes oubliées and the sublime soundscapes of Dutilleux’s Cello Concerto Tout un monde lointain ... with the highly renowned cellist Steven Isserlis.

    •  

    Junge Deutsche Philharmonie
    David Afkham

    Sir Steven Isserlis

    • Olivier Messiaen
      Les Offrandes oubliées, Méditation symphonique pour orchestre

    • Henri Dutilleux
      Tout un monde lointain ..., Cello Concerto

      Sir Steven Isserlis cello

    • Hector Berlioz
      Symphonie fantastique, op. 14

    Concert details will be available soon.

  • Simon Rattle conducts “Parsifal”

    Simon Rattle conducts “Parsifal”

    Richard Wagner called his Parsifal a “A Festival Play for the Consecration of the Stage”, and in fact the term opera would be quite inappropriate. It does not deal with intrigues or romantic entanglements but with Wagner’s central metaphysical preoccupation of redemption, for which he wrote scintillating, intoxicating music of incomparable allure. Simon Rattle conducts the work with an outstanding cast of singers, including Stuart Skelton and Nina Stemme.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Sir Simon Rattle

    Stuart Skelton, Nina Stemme, Franz-Josef Selig, Evgeny Nikitin, Gerald Finley

    • Richard Wagner
      Parsifal

      Stuart Skelton tenor, Nina Stemme soprano, Franz-Josef Selig bass baritone, Evgeny Nikitin bass baritone, Gerald Finley bass baritone, Iwona Sobotka soprano, Kiandra Howarth soprano, Elisabeth Jansson mezzo-soprano, Mari Eriksmoen soprano, Ingeborg Gillebo mezzo-soprano, Kismara Pessatti mezzo-soprano, Neal Cooper tenor, Rundfunkchor Berlin, Simon Halsey chorus master

    Simon Rattle conducts “Parsifal” Go to concert
  • Britten’s “War Requiem” with the National Youth Orchestra of Germany

    Britten’s “War Requiem” with the National Youth Orchestra of Germany

    The National Youth Orchestra of Germany consists of highly gifted young musicians between the ages of 14 and 19. In this concert, the orchestra, whose patron the Berliner Philharmoniker became in 2013, presents Benjamin Britten’s War Requiem – a powerful, poignant plea for international understanding which in this performance is expressed by soloists and choirs from Germany, England, France and Poland.

    •  

    Bundesjugendorchester
    Thomas Neuhoff

    • Benjamin Britten
      War Requiem for Soloists, large Choir, Children’s Choir, large Orchestra and Chamber Orchestra

      Banu Böke soprano, James Gilchrist tenor, Erik Sohn baritone, Chor des Bach-Vereins Köln e.V., Kinderchor N. N.

    Concert details will be available soon.

  • Kirill Petrenko and Yuja Wang

    Kirill Petrenko and Yuja Wang

    Photo: Stefan Rabold

    Kirill Petrenko, chief conductor designate of the Berliner Philharmoniker, presents two sonorous rarities: Anatoly Lyadov’s iridescent tone poem The Enchanted Lake and Franz Schmidt’s Fourth Symphony. The latter is a gently flowing work in the tradition of Anton Bruckner with a powerful funeral march as the highlight. Prokofiev’s Piano Concerto No. 3, on the other hand, played here by Yuja Wang, is a cheerful and virtuoso work.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    Yuja Wang

    • Anatolij Konstantinovic Ljadow
      The Enchanted Lake, op. 62

    • Sergei Prokofiev
      Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 3 in C major, op. 26

      Yuja Wang piano

    • Franz Schmidt
      Symphony No. 4 in C major

    Kirill Petrenko and Yuja Wang Go to concert
  • A Mozart evening with Daniel Harding

    A Mozart evening with Daniel Harding

    Mozart’s C minor Mass is one of the most beautiful works of sacred music ever composed. Choruses of archaic power strikingly alternate with graceful solos, which are perhaps so inspired because Mozart wrote one of the soprano parts for his wife Constanze. Conductor Daniel Harding devotes the rest of the concert to the secular Mozart with the brief, exuberant Symphony No. 32 and two expressive concert arias.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Daniel Harding

    Andrew Staples, Georg Zeppenfeld, Lucy Crowe, Genia Kühmeier

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      Symphony No. 32 in G major, K. 318

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      Misero! O sognoAura, che intorno spiri, Recitative and Aria for Tenor and Orchestra, K. 431

      Andrew Staples tenor

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      Per questa bella mano , Aria for Bass, Double Bass obbligato and Orchestra, K. 612

      Georg Zeppenfeld bass

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      Mass in C minor, K. 427

      Lucy Crowe soprano, Genia Kühmeier soprano, Andrew Staples tenor, Georg Zeppenfeld bass, Swedish Radio Choir, Folke Alin chorus master

    A Mozart evening with Daniel Harding Go to concert
  • Alan Gilbert and Wenzel Fuchs with Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto

    Alan Gilbert and Wenzel Fuchs with Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto

    Mozart was a great fan of the then still new clarinet. He composed a splendid concerto, his last work in that genre, for this instrument, whose tone closely resembles the sound of the human voice. The performers in this concert are Alan Gilbert and the Berliner Philharmoniker’s principal clarinet Wenzel Fuchs. The programme also includes Thomas Ades’s highly original Three Studies from Couperin and Debussy’s shimmering Images pour orchestra.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Alan Gilbert

    Wenzel Fuchs

    • Thomas Adès
      Three Studies from Couperin

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra in A major, K. 622

      Wenzel Fuchs clarinet

    • Claude Debussy
      Images pour orchestre

    Alan Gilbert and Wenzel Fuchs with Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto Go to concert
  • European Concert from Bayreuth with Paavo Järvi

    European Concert from Bayreuth with Paavo Järvi

    Photo: Rainer Viertlböck / Bayerische Schlösserverwaltung

    The venue for this European Concert is an architectural gem: the Margravial Opera House in Bayreuth, one of the few remaining original Baroque theatres, which was declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2012. Joining the orchestra is Paavo Järvi, who has earned a reputation as one of the most interesting conductors of our time, particularly as artistic director of the Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen. The programme will be announced later.

    •  

    European Concert from Bayreuth

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Paavo Järvi

    • Programme to be announced

    Concert details will be available soon.

  • Paavo Järvi and Janine Jansen with Sibelius’s Violin Concerto

    Paavo Järvi and Janine Jansen with Sibelius’s Violin Concerto

    According to the London Times, violinist Janine Jansen is simply “incapable of a dull moment”. In this concert, she plays Sibelius’s popular Violin Concerto, a darkly timbred work whose free, rhapsodic form requires highly creative skill. Paavo Järvi also conducts Shostakovich’s Sixth Symphony, which reflects the horrors of the Stalin era with brooding resignation and grotesque savagery.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Paavo Järvi

    Janine Jansen

    • Jean Sibelius
      Night Ride and Sunrise, Symphonic Poem, op. 55

    • Jean Sibelius
      Violin Concerto in D minor, op. 47

      Janine Jansen violin

    • Dmitri Shostakovich
      Symphony No. 6 in B minor, op. 54

    Paavo Järvi and Janine Jansen with Sibelius’s Violin Concerto Go to concert
  • Tugan Sokhiev conducts “Pictures at an Exhibition”

    Tugan Sokhiev conducts “Pictures at an Exhibition”

    Tugan Sokhiev, chief conductor of the Bolshoi Theatre, conducts two of the most popular works of the Russian repertoire at this concert, which opens with Prokofiev’s ardent Symphony No. 1, inspired by the First Viennese School. In contrast, Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition depicts Russian scenes and legends with incomparable atmospheric and musical intensity. The soloist in Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 3 is Yefim Bronfman.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Tugan Sokhiev

    Yefim Bronfman

    • Sergei Prokofiev
      Symphony No. 1 in D major, op. 25 Symphonie classique

    • Ludwig van Beethoven
      Concerto for Piano and Orchestra in C minor, op. 37

      Yefim Bronfman piano

    • Modest Mussorgsky
      Pictures at an Exhibition (orch. Maurice Ravel)

    Tugan Sokhiev conducts “Pictures at an Exhibition” Go to concert
  • Simon Rattle conducts Schumann’s “Paradise and the Peri”

    Simon Rattle conducts Schumann’s “Paradise and the Peri”

    Incredibly successful in its time but largely forgotten today, Robert Schumann’s Paradise and the Peri was described by the composer as an “oratorio for cheerful people”. For many years, Simon Rattle has championed this both lyrical and innovative work, which he says has given him an entirely new perspective on Schumann. Following a first performance in 2009, he conducts it again with an ensemble of outstanding soloists.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Sir Simon Rattle

    Sally Matthews, Mark Padmore, Anna Prohaska, Gerhild Romberger, Andrew Staples, Christian Gerhaher

    • Robert Schumann
      Paradise and the Peri, op. 50

      Sally Matthews soprano, Mark Padmore tenor, Anna Prohaska soprano, Gerhild Romberger contralto, Andrew Staples tenor, Christian Gerhaher baritone, Rundfunkchor Berlin, Gijs Leenaars chorus master

    Simon Rattle conducts Schumann’s “Paradise and the Peri” Go to concert
  • Simon Rattle conducts the completed Ninth Symphony by Anton Bruckner

    Simon Rattle conducts the completed Ninth Symphony by Anton Bruckner

    Simon Rattle is certain that if Anton Bruckner had lived only two months longer, he would have been able to complete the finale of his Ninth Symphony. In a sensational concert in 2011, Rattle presented a reconstruction of “monolithic, threatening presence” (Gramophone magazine), based on Bruckner’s extensive sketches. As a central work of the Rattle era, the completed symphony can now be heard again.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Sir Simon Rattle

    • Hans Abrahamsen
      Three Pieces for Orchestra, commissioned by the Berliner Philharmoniker Foundation Première

    • Anton Bruckner
      Symphony No. 9 with the completed performance version of the 4th Movement by Samale-Phillips-Cohrs-Mazzuca (1985-2008/rev. 2010)

    Simon Rattle conducts the completed Ninth Symphony by Anton Bruckner Go to concert
  • Simon Rattle conducts Brahms, Lutosławski and Widmann

    Simon Rattle conducts Brahms, Lutosławski and Widmann

    This concert is almost a condensed retrospective of the Rattle era. For example, Sir Simon’s enthusiasm for contemporary music is revealed in the premiere of a short work by Jörg Widmann; in Lutosławski’s Third Symphony, on the other hand, he once again shows what imaginative music the 20th century has left behind, and finally, Rattle’s continuous work on the great classics of the repertoire is represented by Brahms’s First Symphony.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Sir Simon Rattle

    • Jörg Widmann
      New Work commissioned by the Berliner Philharmoniker Foundation Première

    • Witold Lutosławski
      Symphony No. 3

    • Johannes Brahms
      Symphony No. 1 in C minor, op. 68

    Simon Rattle conducts Brahms, Lutosławski and Widmann Go to concert
  • Simon Rattle’s farewell to the Berlin Philharmonie

    Simon Rattle’s farewell to the Berlin Philharmonie

    On 14 November 1987, a promising conductor made his Berliner Philharmoniker debut with Gustav Mahler’s Sixth Symphony: Simon Rattle. In retrospect Rattle says, “I felt that I was finding my voice on that day.” Mahler’s multifaceted work is now again on the programme when Sir Simon appears for the last time as chief conductor of the Berliner Philharmoniker in the Philharmonie. The wheel comes full circle.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Sir Simon Rattle

    • Gustav Mahler
      Symphony No. 6

    Simon Rattle’s farewell to the Berlin Philharmonie Go to concert
  • Simon Rattle and Magdalena Kožená at the Waldbühne

    Simon Rattle and Magdalena Kožená at the Waldbühne

    An era is about to come to an end for the Berliner Philharmoniker. With this concert at the Waldbühne, Sir Simon Rattle’s tenure as chief conductor of the orchestra ends after 16 years. It is a colourful, sparkling farewell – with works by Gershwin, Fauré, Khachaturian and Respighi. The star guest is Sir Simon’s wife, mezzo-soprano Magdalena Kožená, who sings excerpts from Joseph Canteloube’s charming Chants d’Auvergne.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Sir Simon Rattle

    Magdalena Kožená

    • George Gershwin
      Cuban Overture

    • Gabriel Fauré
      Pavane

    • Joseph Canteloube (de Malaret)
      Chants d’Auvergne (Selection)

      Magdalena Kožená mezzo-soprano

    • Aram Khachaturian
      Suite from Gayaneh

    • Ottorino Respighi
      Pini di Roma

    • Paul Lincke
      Berliner Luft

    Simon Rattle and Magdalena Kožená at the Waldbühne Go to concert