Berliner Philharmoniker as soloists

Berliner Philharmoniker as soloists
  • Richard Strauss
    Concerto for Oboe and small Orchestra in D major, o. op. AV 144 (28 min.)

    Berliner Philharmoniker

    Christian Thielemann

    Albrecht Mayer Oboe

  • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    Concerto for Violin and Orchestra No. 5 in A major, K. 219 (34 min.)

    Berliner Philharmoniker

    Mikko Franck

    Noah Bendix-Balgley violin and direction

  • William Walton
    Concerto for Viola and Orchestra (Revised Version from 1962) (37 min.)

    Berliner Philharmoniker

    Sir Simon Rattle

    Amihai Grosz viola

  • Joseph Haydn
    Concerto for Cello and Orchestra No. 2 in D major, Hob. VIIb:2 (27 min.)

    Berliner Philharmoniker

    Michael Sanderling

    Bruno Delepelaire cello

  • Claude Debussy
    Danse sacrée et danse profane for harp and string orchestra (12 min.)

    Berliner Philharmoniker

    Christian Thielemann

    Marie-Pierre Langlamet Harp

  • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    Concerto for Flute and Orchestra No. 2 in D major, K. 314 (21 min.)

    Berliner Philharmoniker

    Mariss Jansons

    Emmanuel Pahud Flute

  • Luciano Berio
    Ritorno degli snovidenia for cello and 30 instruments (23 min.)

    Berliner Philharmoniker

    Sir Simon Rattle

    Olaf Maninger Violoncello, Karajan Academy of the Berliner Philharmoniker

  • Witold Lutosławski
    Double Concerto for Oboe, Harp and String Orchestra (22 min.)

    Berliner Philharmoniker

    Sir Simon Rattle

    Marie-Pierre Langlamet Harp, Jonathan Kelly Oboe

  • Carl Maria von Weber
    Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra No. 1 in F minor, op. 73 (26 min.)

    Berliner Philharmoniker

    Mariss Jansons

    Andreas Ottensamer Clarinet

  • Rudi Stephan
    Music for Violin and Orchestra (20 min.)

    Berliner Philharmoniker

    Kirill Petrenko

    Daniel Stabrawa Violin

  • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra in A major, K. 622 (35 min.)

    Berliner Philharmoniker

    Alan Gilbert

    Wenzel Fuchs clarinet

  • Jean Sibelius
    Lemminkäinen Suite, op. 22: No. 2 The Swan of Tuonela (11 min.)

    Berliner Philharmoniker

    Sir Simon Rattle

    Bruno Delepelaire Cello, Dominik Wollenweber Cor Anglais

  • Hans Abrahamsen
    Concerto for Horn and Orchestra − commissioned jointly by the Berliner Philharmoniker Foundation, the NHK Symphony Orchestra, the NTR Zaterdag Matinee, the Seattle Symphony Orchestra and the Auckland Philharmonia Premiere (21 min.)

    Berliner Philharmoniker

    Paavo Järvi

    Stefan Dohr french horn

  • Sergei Prokofiev
    Concerto for Violin and Orchestra No. 1 in D major, op. 19 (28 min.)

    Berliner Philharmoniker

    Sir Simon Rattle

    Daishin Kashimoto Violin

  • Richard Strauss
    Don Quixote, Symphonic Poem, op. 35 (49 min.)

    Berliner Philharmoniker

    Zubin Mehta

    Amihai Grosz viola, Ludwig Quandt cello

“It can be asserted without hesitation that in a first-rate orchestral body, every member deserves to be described as an ʻartistʼ.” This quote from Arthur Nikisch, who was chief conductor of the Berliner Philharmoniker from 1895 to 1922, formulates a standard that has remained characteristic of the orchestra to this day. As a member of the collective, each Philharmoniker is both an individual and a chamber musician. The vibrancy of sound and interpretation is created by balancing individual expression with collective vision. 

Some former Philharmonikers, such as cellist Gregor Piatigorsky and flautist Aurèle Nicolet, have enjoyed an international solo career after leaving the orchestra. The instrumentalists featured in the present playlist already appear regularly as chamber musicians or soloists parallel to their orchestra work. And so this selection documents not least the continuation of a wonderful Philharmoniker tradition.

It presents musicians who joined the orchestra at very different times, thus demonstrating the balance between continuity and change that characterises the Philharmoniker. In a selection of works ranging from the Baroque era to solo concertos by Haydn and Mozart, and from the virtuoso repertoire of the Romantic period to the world premiere of Hans Abrahamsen’s Horn Concerto, members of the Philharmoniker perform as soloists in the familiar company of their orchestral colleagues.