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Concert archive
Try out the Digital Concert Hall!

Try out the Digital Concert Hall!

In our free playlist, Kirill Petrenko conducts works including Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony and Peter Tchaikovsky’s Pathétique. The best seat in the house is reserved just for you!

View our free playlist

Our latest 10 concerts:

  • A musical journey with the brass and percussion of the Berliner Philharmoniker

    A musical journey with the brass and percussion of the Berliner Philharmoniker

    Photo: Monika Rittershaus

    The members of the Berliner Philharmoniker invite you on a musical journey from America and Russia to Asia with a delightful combination of brass instruments and percussion: Aaron Copland’s Fanfare for the Common Man is answered by Joan Tower’s Fanfare for the Uncommon Woman, and the meditations of a Chinese nun in Wen-Chung Chou’s Soliloquy of a Bhiksuni is contrasted with Mussorgsky’s powerful Pictures at an Exhibition.

    22 Nov 2020

    Brass and percussionists of the Berliner Philharmoniker
    Thomas Guggeis

    Emmanuel Pahud

    • Stefan Dohr on the programme

    • Aaron Copland · Joan Tower
      Fanfare for the Common Man · Fanfare for the Uncommon Woman

    • Wen-Chung Chou
      Soliloquy of a Bhiksuni

    • André Jolivet
      Suite en concert for flute and four percussionists

      Emmanuel Pahud flute

    • Modest Mussorgsky
      Pictures at an Exhibition (arr. by Elgar Howarth)

    A musical journey with the brass and percussion of the Berliner Philharmoniker Go to concert
  • Kirill Petrenko conducts Shostakovich’s Eighth Symphony

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Shostakovich’s Eighth Symphony

    Photo: Stephan Rabold

    Following the performance of the Ninth Symphony at the end of October, the Berliner Philharmoniker with chief conductor Kirill Petrenko will now present Shostakovich’s Eighth, which will be broadcast from the Philharmonie Berlin without an audience. The stirring music, which was created in the middle of the Second World War, is characterised by not only sadness and despair but also by beauty and hope. Organised spontaneously for the Digital Concert Hall, the performance is intended for classical music fans from all over the world to bridge the period of closed concert halls.

    13 Nov 2020

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    • Dmitri Shostakovich
      Symphony No. 8 in C minor, op. 65

    • free

      Interview
      Kirill Petrenko in conversation with Noah Bendix-Balgley

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Shostakovich’s Eighth Symphony Go to concert
  • Family Concert: The Carnival of the Animals

    Family Concert: The Carnival of the Animals

    Photo: Martin Walz

    Chickens clucking, zebras running and kangaroos jumping around: Camille Saint-Saëns created colourful and captivating music about the animal world in his famous Carnival of the Animals. Which pachyderm has hidden himself in the double bass? And what strange creatures are jumping out of the xylophone? Actor Nina Hoss and the pianist brothers Lucas and Arthur Jussen go on a voyage of discovery together with the Karajan Academy, conducted by Nodoka Okisawa. As an introduction, Maurice Ravel’s Ma Mère l’Oye (“Mother Goose”) whisks us away to the world of animals.

    01 Nov 2020
    Family Concert

    Karajan Academy of the Berliner Philharmoniker
    Nodoka Okisawa

    Nina Hoss, Lucas Jussen, Arthur Jussen

    • free

      Maurice Ravel
      Ma Mère l’Oye (arr. by Matthias Kaufmann)

    • free

      Camille Saint-Saëns
      The Carnival of the Animals with texts by Loriot

      Nina Hoss speaker, Lucas Jussen piano, Arthur Jussen piano

    Family Concert: The Carnival of the Animals Go to concert
  • Kirill Petrenko conducts Strauss, Shostakovich and Norman

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Strauss, Shostakovich and Norman

    Photo: Frederike van der Stræten

    Chief conductor Kirill Petrenko presents two works that reflect the end of the Second World War in very different ways. On the one hand Richard Strauss’s Metamorphosen: a web of sound for 23 solo strings that with warmth and transparency mourns a devastated world. In the case of Shostakovich’s Ninth Symphony, the Soviet rulers hoped for a victory symphony – but received a bright, ironic work that refuses to rejoice. We also hear Andrew Norman’s Sabina, a sound painting full of iridescent reflections of light.

    31 Oct 2020

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    • Andrew Norman
      Sabina (arr. for string orchestra)

    • Richard Strauss
      Metamorphosen for 23 solo strings

    • Dmitri Shostakovich
      Symphony No. 9 in E flat major, op. 70

    • John Cage
      4′33″

    • free

      Interview
      Kirill Petrenko in conversation with Eva-Maria Tomasi

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Strauss, Shostakovich and Norman Go to concert
  • Daniel Barenboim conducts Smetana’s “Má vlast”

    Daniel Barenboim conducts Smetana’s “Má vlast”

    Photo: Monika Rittershaus

    Everyone knows Bedřich Smetana’s The Moldau – but almost no one knows the cycle Ma vlast, from which this wonderful river portrait is taken. But Smetana’s vision of creating a panorama of his Czech homeland is only conveyed in the complete work, with its vivid descriptions of nature and dramatic depictions of myths and historical events. At the helm of this performance is Daniel Barenboim, honorary conductor of the Berliner Philharmoniker, who has a particular flair for the powerful colours of late-Romantic music.

    24 Oct 2020

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Daniel Barenboim

    • Bedřich Smetana
      Má vlast (My Homeland)

    • free

      Interview
      Daniel Barenboim in conversation with Christoph Streuli

    Daniel Barenboim conducts Smetana’s “Má vlast” Go to concert
  • Marc Minkowski conducts Haydn and Beethoven

    Marc Minkowski conducts Haydn and Beethoven

    Photo: Monika Rittershaus

    God, rebel and bringer of fire – Prometheus is one of the most important figures in Greek mythology, a shining example of the Enlightenment and a symbol of its impossibility at the same time. Many artists felt called upon to interpret his story. Beethoven reworked Prometheus’ advocacy of mankind through his theft of fire into a heroic-allegorical ballet. It is preceded by a thematically related work, Joseph Haydn’s so-called “Fire Symphony” which is characterised by a passionate, dramatic tone.

    17 Oct 2020

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Marc Minkowski

    • Joseph Haydn
      Symphony No. 59 in A major “Fire Symphony”

    • Ludwig van Beethoven
      The Creatures of Prometheus, ballet music, op. 43

    • free

      Interview
      Marc Minkowski in conversation with Bruno Delepelaire

    Marc Minkowski conducts Haydn and Beethoven Go to concert
  • François-Xavier Roth and Tabea Zimmermann

    François-Xavier Roth and Tabea Zimmermann

    Photo: Frederike van der Stræten

    Paul Hindemith is a composer close to Tabea Zimmermann’s heart. It thus comes as no surprise that as artist in residence she will perform his viola concerto Der Schwanendreher. The work owes its peculiar title to a German folk song whose melody forms the basis of the third movement. Béla Bartók was also inspired by folk music in his Divertimento. His work is based on Romanian and Hungarian dance music. The programme, conducted by François-Xavier Roth, opens with Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach’s First Symphony, which already clearly looks ahead to the First Viennese School.

    10 Oct 2020

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    François-Xavier Roth

    Tabea Zimmermann

    • Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach
      Symphony in D major, Wq 183 No. 1

    • Paul Hindemith
      Der Schwanendreher, Concerto on old folk songs for viola and small orchestra

      Tabea Zimmermann viola

    • Johann Sebastian Bach
      Sonata for Viola da Gamba in D Major, BWV 1028: Andante

      Tabea Zimmermann viola, Marie-Pierre Langlamet harp

    • Béla Bartók
      Divertimento for String Orchestra, Sz 113

    • free

      Interview
      Tabea Zimmermann in conversation with Julia Gartemann

    François-Xavier Roth and Tabea Zimmermann Go to concert
  • Marek Janowski and Noah Bendix-Balgley

    Marek Janowski and Noah Bendix-Balgley

    Photo: Stephan Rabold

    With this programme we commemorate Max Bruch, the 100th anniversary of whose death is remembered in 2020. Our 1st concertmaster, Noah Bendix-Balgley, is the soloist in this performance of Bruch’s First Violin Concerto with the Berliner Philharmoniker under the baton of Marek Janowski. With its yearning opening movement and sparkling finale, this work became the composer’s most popular work. The second part of the concert is dedicated to Johannes Brahms, a contemporary of Bruch. His Serenade No. 2 is characterised by the dark, warm sound typical of Brahms and is considered a milestone on the composer’s path to the symphony.

    03 Oct 2020

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Marek Janowski

    Noah Bendix-Balgley

    • Max Bruch
      Concerto for Violin and Orchestra No. 1 in G minor, op. 26

      Noah Bendix-Balgley violin

    • Johann Sebastian Bach
      Sonata No. 1 in G minor, BWV 1001: Adagio

      Noah Bendix-Balgley violin

    • Johannes Brahms
      Serenade No. 2 in A major, op. 16

    • free

      Interview
      Noah Bendix-Balgley in conversation with Stanley Dodds

    Marek Janowski and Noah Bendix-Balgley Go to concert
  • Lahav Shani and Francesco Piemontesi

    Lahav Shani and Francesco Piemontesi

    Photo: Stephan Rabold

    Double debut with two rising stars: Lahav Shani, successor to Zubin Mehta as music director of the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra and principal conductor of the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra, and pianist Francesco Piemontesi, considered one of the most interesting Mozart interpreters of his generation. In this concert, he introduces himself with the last piano concerto by the First Viennese School composer. The main symphonic work is Robert Schumann’s First Symphony, which the newly married composer wrote in the euphoric mood of a new beginning.

    26 Sep 2020

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Lahav Shani

    Francesco Piemontesi

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 27 in B flat major, K. 595

      Francesco Piemontesi piano

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      Piano Sonata in F major K. 332: Adagio

      Francesco Piemontesi piano

    • Robert Schumann
      Symphony No. 1 in B flat major, op. 38 “Spring”

    • free

      Interview
      Lahav Shani in conversation with Amihai Grosz

    Lahav Shani and Francesco Piemontesi Go to concert
  • Kirill Petrenko and Frank Peter Zimmermann

    Kirill Petrenko and Frank Peter Zimmermann

    “Alban Berg’s Violin Concerto is a piece that gets under your skin,” says violinist Frank Peter Zimmermann. Devastated by the death of Manon Gropius, the daughter of Alma Mahler and Walter Gropius, the composer created a musical memorial to the young girl with this work, and at the same time created one of the most poignant concertos of the 20th century. Antonín Dvořák strikes a completely different mood in his Fifth Symphony – one that is cheerful, relaxed and pastoral. The work is dedicated to Hans von Bülow, the first chief conductor of the Berliner Philharmoniker.

    19 Sep 2020

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    Frank Peter Zimmermann

    • Alban Berg
      Concerto for Violin and Orchestra “To the Memory of an Angel”

      Frank Peter Zimmermann violin

    • Johann Sebastian Bach
      Violin Sonata No. 3 in C major, BWV 1005: Largo

      Frank Peter Zimmermann violin

    • Antonín Dvořák
      Symphony No. 5 in F major, op. 76

    • free

      Interview
      Frank Peter Zimmermann on Alban Berg’s Violin Concerto “To the Memory of an Angel”

    • free

      Interview
      Kirill Petrenko in conversation with Albrecht Mayer

    Kirill Petrenko and Frank Peter Zimmermann Go to concert