Liszt’s Piano Concerto No. 1 with Tugan Sokhiev and Boris Berezovsky

21/01/2012

Berliner Philharmoniker
Tugan Sokhiev

Boris Berezovsky, Amihai Grosz

  • Albert Roussel
    Bacchus et Ariane, Suite No. 2 (00:18:46)

  • Franz Liszt
    Piano Concerto No. 1 in E flat major (00:19:15)

    Boris Berezovsky Piano

  • Isaac Albéniz
    Tango in D (00:03:25)

  • Luciano Berio
    Sequenza VI for viola (00:15:39)

    Amihai Grosz Viola

  • Sergei Rachmaninov
    Symphonic Dances (00:42:05)

  • free

    Boris Berezovsky on Liszt’s First Piano Concerto (00:14:40)

“If it were possible to cross conductors with one another, then Tugan Sokhiev would perhaps be the perfect blend of Christian Thielemann, Gustavo Dudamel and the Russian school.” This was how one critic described the debut of the young Ossetian with the Berliner Philharmoniker in January 2010. Philharmoniker audiences once again have the opportunity to experience the multi-faceted qualities of this conductor – who from September 2012, as music director of the Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin, will play an active role in the city’s music scene.

In the Berlin Philharmonie, Boris Berezovsky will be at his side – “surely the true successor to the great Russian pianists of the past,” according to Gramophone magazine. In Franz Liszt’s Piano Concerto No. 1, the musicians perform a work that moves confidently between raging fury and delicate cantabile. Liszt at the same time achieves one of his major artistic goals: namely, to extend the expression and tone of the piano to the limits of possibility.

The potential of various solo instruments is also fully exploited in Luciano Berio’s Sequenzas. In the case of Sequenza VI, it is the viola, played here by Amihai Grosz, who has been principal violist with the Berliner Philharmoniker since 2010.

In the two remaining works of the evening on the other hand – Sergei Rachmaninov’s Symphonic Dances and Albert Roussel’s ballet music Bacchus et Ariane – the whole broad colour spectrum of the orchestral sound is revealed. Roussel proves to be a composer who combines gorgeous impressionistic sophistication with unbridled temperament and certainly deserves a stronger presence in the concert world.