Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts Brahms’s “Ein deutsches Requiem”

Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts Brahms’s “Ein deutsches Requiem”

Brahms’s Ein deutsches Requiem is a powerful, solemn work, yet its message shows the utmost compassion. While the horrors of the last judgement are the focus in traditional requiem settings, Brahms’s work sings sensitively of sorrow and consolation in the face of death. The conductor of this performance is Yannick Nézet-Séguin, music director of the Philadelphia Orchestra and music director designate of the Met in New York.

Go to concertYannick Nézet-Séguin conducts Brahms’s “Ein deutsches Requiem”

Sat, 28 Oct 2017, 19:00 (Berlin time)

Ton Koopman conducts Bach’s Mass in B Minor

Ton Koopman conducts Bach’s Mass in B Minor
The B minor Mass is Johann Sebastian Bach’s legacy to vocal music: a cosmos of all the forms and styles that make his sacred works so rich. There are arias of dance-like lightness as well as austere Renaissance singing, ingeniously constructed fugues and jubilant choruses. In this concert the work is performed under the baton of Ton Koopman, a conductor, organist and harpsichordist who is one of the great Bach interpreters of our time.

New in the concert archive

Alain Altinoglu debuts with the Berliner Philharmoniker

Alain Altinoglu debuts with the Berliner Philharmoniker
The transition to Modernism is one of the most exciting phases in musical history. In this concert, works by Maurice Ravel, Béla Bartók, Claude Debussy and Albert Roussel reveal the richness of late Romanticism combined with originality and pioneering spirit. Alain Altinoglu, the “sensitive magician of timbre” (Süddeutsche Zeitung), makes his debut conducting the Berliner Philharmoniker with Máté Szűcs as the soloist in Bartók’s Viola Concerto.

New in the concert archive

Susanna Mälkki and Gil Shaham

Susanna Mälkki and Gil Shaham
The works of this evening with Susanna Mälkki look both back to the past and forward to the future. For example, Béla Bartók’s Second Violin Concerto, with soloist Gil Shaham, is in the tradition of Beethoven and Brahms but also experiments with the twelve-tone technique. Jean Sibelius’s Second Symphony, on the other hand, combines echoes of Tchaikovsky with innovative form, while Ferruccio Busoni’s Tanz-Walzer conjures up the atmosphere of a coffee house.

New in the concert archive

Simon Rattle with Mitsuko Uchida and Amihai Grosz

Simon Rattle with Mitsuko Uchida and Amihai Grosz
Delicate melancholy and lyrical sensuousness characterise the two solo concertos on this programme with Simon Rattle, Mitsuko Uchida and Amihai Grosz. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart seems to reflect on his life in his last piano concerto, while William Walton’s Viola Concerto is dominated by the dark tone of the solo instrument. As a counterpoint, the concert closes with Zoltán Kodály’s humorously grotesque Háry János Suite.

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Marek Janowski conducts Bruckner’s Fourth Symphony

Marek Janowski conducts Bruckner’s Fourth Symphony
Marek Janowski is regarded as the perfect embodiment of the Kapellmeister tradition and a master of late-Romantic repertoire, and this programme with Bruckner’s Fourth Symphony and preludes from Pfitzner’s Palestrina emphasizes these qualities. The special charm of both works is the way they look to the past: Pfitzner evokes the world of the Renaissance, while Bruckner immerses himself in a medieval age full of knights and sounds of the forest.

Recommendation of the week

Karajan conducts Tchaikovsky’s Symphonies Nos. 4–6

Karajan conducts Tchaikovsky’s Symphonies Nos. 4–6
Hardly any other composer bequeathed a legacy of such uninhibitedly emotional music as did Peter Tchaikovsky. He brilliantly fused personal experience and suffering with superb composition, creating uniquely thrilling and touching works. It is evident that Herbert von Karajan, master of luscious sound and emphasis, was an ideal Tchaikovsky interpreter. In these recordings from 1973 he is conducting the last three symphonies, including the famous Pathétique.