Daniel Harding conducts Mahler’s First Symphony

Daniel Harding conducts Mahler’s First Symphony

The music of Gustav Mahler stands on the threshold of Modernism: sometimes sceptical, sometimes self-confident, and yet despite occasional nostalgic impulses, it is always decidedly innovative. Daniel Harding juxtaposes Mahler’s First Symphony with works by Alban Berg and Charles Ives, contemporaries whose musical language has similarities as well as major differences to Mahler. An exciting journey of discovery.

Go to concertDaniel Harding conducts Mahler’s First Symphony

Sun, 28 Apr 2019, 19:00 (Berlin time)

Zubin Mehta conducts “Otello”

Zubin Mehta conducts “Otello”
The 75-year-old Giuseppe Verdi once again reached a new artistic level with Otello. None of his other operas is as compelling or has such dramatic force, right up to the murderous finale. Following the performances at the Easter Festival in Baden-Baden, the Berliner Philharmoniker present their interpretation of this dark, expressive score to the Berlin public together with a cast of prominent singers and conductor Zubin Mehta.

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Kirill Petrenko and Patricia Kopatchinskaja

Kirill Petrenko and Patricia Kopatchinskaja
In this concert, Kirill Petrenko made his last appearance with the Berliner Philharmoniker before taking up office as their chief conductor. First, soloist Patricia Kopatchinskaja showed how much virtuosity and expressive variety there is in Arnold Schoenberg’s Violin Concerto. Then came Tchaikovsky’s passionate Fifth Symphony in a performance full of power and dedication, “with a final passage like a casting out of devils .... The hall was completely breathless with enthusiasm and anticipation of what the future holds” (Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung).

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Zubin Mehta and Martin Grubinger

Zubin Mehta and Martin Grubinger
Martin Grubinger, the “multi-percussion star, who runs around between his many instruments during his performances with dizzying acrobatics” (Süddeutsche Zeitung) makes his debut here with the Berliner Philharmoniker. The concert includes Peter Eötvös’s Speaking Drums where Grubinger can demonstrate his breathtaking versatility. Conductor Zubin Mehta also presents Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov’s exotic and powerful Scheherazade Suite.

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Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts Debussy and Prokofiev

Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts Debussy and Prokofiev
The culmination of this concert with Yannick Nézet-Séguin is Sergei Prokofiev’s Fifth Symphony, a both overpowering and vivid work, which also includes “the primitive nature of Russian song ... in its melodies” (A. Khachaturian). The French-Canadian Nézet-Séguin opens the concert with French repertoire: Maurice Ravel's charming Menuet antique and Claude Debussy's dazzling La Mer – a masterpiece of musical Impressionism.

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Bach’s “St John Passion” with Simon Rattle and Peter Sellars

Bach’s “St John Passion” with Simon Rattle and Peter Sellars
A double reunion: for the first time since the end of his tenure as chief conductor of the orchestra, Sir Simon Rattle returns to the Berliner Philharmoniker. The programme features one of the most sensational productions of those years: Bach’s St. John Passion in the production of Peter Sellars, which uses intensive imagery to accentuate the meditative as well as the dramatic dimensions of the work. The singers include the Rundfunkchor Berlin and a top-class ensemble of soloists.

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“Late Night” concert with Patricia Kopatchinskaja

“Late Night” concert with Patricia Kopatchinskaja
The mysterious, expressionistic miniatures of Arnold Schoenberg’s Pierrot lunaire cycle are perfect for a Late Night concert. The wonderful violinist Patricia Kopatchinskaja, who enjoys the experimental, recites the poems that underlie the work. The concert also includes waltzes by Johann Strauss II in arrangements by Arnold Schoenberg and Anton Webern. In these arrangements, Patricia Kopatchinskaja returns to her usual role as a violinist.

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Piano recital with Daniil Trifonov

Piano recital with Daniil Trifonov
“He has everything and more, there is tenderness and also the demonic element. I never heard anything like that,” was how Martha Argerich expressed her astonishment at Daniil Trifonov, the Berliner Philharmoniker’s Artist in Residence this season. He can now be heard in a solo recital in the Philharmonie. With works by Beethoven, Schumann and Prokofiev, he travels through the almost one and a half centuries when piano music flourished.

Recommendation of the week

Tugan Sokhiev and Jean-Yves Thibaudet

Tugan Sokhiev and Jean-Yves Thibaudet
Although French music often comes across as rather fragile, there are also powerful counterexamples. Thus, César Franck’s D minor Symphony and Gabriel Fauré’s Pelléas et Mélisande radiate – besides French flair – a Beethovenian will to find the right form. Maurice Ravel, in contrast, strikes a crisp, jazzy tone in the Finale of his G major piano concerto, as one might more readily expect from Gershwin. Tugan Sokhiev conducts; at the piano is Jean-Yves Thibaudet.