Simon Rattle and Daniel Barenboim with Bartók’s Piano Concerto No. 1

Simon Rattle and Daniel Barenboim with Bartók’s Piano Concerto No. 1

In 1964, Daniel Barenboim made his acclaimed debut with the Berliner Philharmoniker playing Bartók’s Piano Concerto No. 1. Now, with Simon Rattle as conductor, he again devotes himself to this fascinating piece in which the piano is featured as an unrelenting percussion instrument. The other works on the programme are also marked by energetic urgency: Janáček’s Sinfonietta with its striking fanfares and Dvořák’s Slavonic Dances.

Go to concertSimon Rattle and Daniel Barenboim with Bartók’s Piano Concerto No. 1

Sat, 03 Mar 2018, 19:00 (Berlin time)

Daniel Harding conducts “An Alpine Symphony”

Daniel Harding conducts “An Alpine Symphony”
Richard Strauss was not only a master of orchestration but an enthusiastic mountaineer as well. Thus, it is not surprising that in his last symphonic poem he depicted a hike in the Alps – vivid and haunting, with an endless palette of tonal colours. Conductor Daniel Harding and bass-baritone Gerald Finley also present familiar Schubert songs in rarely heard orchestral arrangements by Brahms and Reger.

New in the concert archive

Dima Slobodeniouk and Baiba Skride

Dima Slobodeniouk and Baiba Skride
This programme of music from north-eastern Europe is wonderfully austere, at times melancholy, at times brutal. We hear the mythical sounds of Jean Sibelius’s tone poem Tapiola, the industrial power of Sergei Prokofiev’s Second Symphony and Dmitri Shostakovich’s Second Violin Concerto, which alternates between passion and disenchanted sadness. Dima Slobodeniouk makes his conducting debut with the orchestra; the violin soloist is Baiba Skride.

New in the concert archive

Mikko Franck conducts Ravel’s “L’Enfant et les sortilèges”

Mikko Franck conducts Ravel’s “L’Enfant et les sortilèges”
Ravel’s short opera L’Enfant et les sortilèges is a work full of imagination, charm and humour. Like in a revue, the composer employs a wide range of musical styles one after another, from neo-Baroque sounds to ragtime. The conductor of this concert performance is Mikko Franck, who steps in for Seiji Ozawa. The focus of the first part of the evening is our 1st concertmaster, Noah Bendix-Balgley, who plays (without the participation of Mikko Franck) works by Mozart and Saint-Saëns.

New in the concert archive

Adam Fischer and Leonidas Kavakos

Adam Fischer and Leonidas Kavakos
Dark tones in every shade dominate the beginning of this concert. For example, Alban Berg's Violin Concerto, written in memory of the 19-year-old Manon Gropius, is one of the most poignant works of Modernism. Anton Webern’s delicate Passacaglia was written with the death of the composer’s own mother still fresh in his mind. In contrast to these is Antonín Dvořák's Ninth Symphony From the New World with its folkloric cheerfulness and ingenious combination of American and Bohemian idioms.

New in the concert archive

Mariss Jansons and Daniil Trifonov with Schumann’s Piano Concerto

Mariss Jansons and Daniil Trifonov with Schumann’s Piano Concerto
In this concert, Mariss Jansons, a celebrated interpreter of the Romantic repertoire, reveals the entire musical and emotional range of this epoch. On the one hand, the wild virtuosity of Schumann’s rapturous Piano Concerto, on the other, the deeply religious grandeur of Bruckner’s Sixth Symphony. The piano soloist is Daniil Trifonov, who combines sensational technique with sensitivity and maturity of expression.

Recommendation of the week

Simon Rattle conducts Beethoven’s Symphonies Nos. 1 and 3

Simon Rattle conducts Beethoven’s Symphonies Nos. 1 and 3
Performing all the Beethoven symphonies is always a unique project. After a first series in 2008, the Berliner Philharmoniker and Simon Rattle presented their interpretation once again in October 2015. The starting point is the First Symphony, whose dissonant opening chord already announces the exciting individuality of the cycle – before the fierce Eroica conclusively breaks with all musical standards of the time.