Live concerts

  • Repeat: Daniel Barenboim conducts Smetana’s “Má vlast”

    Repeat: Daniel Barenboim conducts Smetana’s “Má vlast”

    Photo: Peter Adamik

    A masterpiece of Czech romantic music, Bedřich Smetana’s Má vlast (My Homeland), can be heard at this concert. The cycle of six symphonic poems, composed within five years, is rarely performed in its entirety; one usually hears only “The Moldau”, the best-known part. In terms of content, Smetana is dealing with the myths of his Czech homeland in addition to its landscape. You can look forward to experiencing how Daniel Barenboim, who has been conducting the Berliner Philharmoniker for 51 years by now, will interpret the entire cycle.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Daniel Barenboim

    • Bedřich Smetana
      Má vlast (My Homeland)

    • Interview
      approx. 15 min before the concert: Daniel Barenboim in conversation with Christoph Streuli

    Repeat: Daniel Barenboim conducts Smetana’s “Má vlast” Go to concert
  • Kirill Petrenko conducts Strauss, Shostakovich and Norman

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Strauss, Shostakovich and Norman

    Photo: Monika Rittershaus

    Dmitri Shostakovich’s Ninth Symphony was dismissed by his contemporaries as superficial and garish. At the end of the Second World War, a work was expected that would glorify the victory. But Shostakovich refused these demands, and in the symphony he reduces the heroic glorification to absurdity. At almost the same time, Richard Strauss wrote his Metamorphosen, in which he gave musical expression to his grief over the demise of a cultural epoch. Chief conductor Kirill Petrenko feels a deep connection to both composers and juxtaposes their works with a piece by Andrew Norman, born in 1979.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    • Andrew Norman
      Sabina (arr. for string orchestra)

    • Richard Strauss
      Metamorphosen for 23 solo strings

    • Dmitri Shostakovich
      Symphony No. 9 in E flat major, op. 70

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Strauss, Shostakovich and Norman Go to concert
  • Daniel Barenboim and Emmanuel Pahud

    Daniel Barenboim and Emmanuel Pahud

    Photo: Peter Adamik

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Daniel Barenboim

    • Jacques Ibert
      Concerto for Flute and Orchestra

      Emmanuel Pahud flute

    • Hector Berlioz
      Symphonie fantastique, op. 14

    Daniel Barenboim and Emmanuel Pahud Go to concert
  • Tugan Sokhiev and Nicolas Altstaedt

    Tugan Sokhiev and Nicolas Altstaedt

    Photo: Marco Borggreve

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Tugan Sokhiev

    Nicolas Altstaedt

    • Igor Stravinsky
      Pulcinella: Suite

    • Camille Saint-Saëns
      Concerto for Cello and Orchestra No. 1 in A minor, op. 33

      Nicolas Altstaedt cello

    • Georges Bizet
      Symphony in C major

    Tugan Sokhiev and Nicolas Altstaedt Go to concert
  • Andris Nelsons and Baiba Skride

    Andris Nelsons and Baiba Skride

    Photo: Marco Borggreve

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Andris Nelsons

    Baiba Skride

    • Igor Stravinsky
      Concerto in D for Violin and Orchestra

      Baiba Skride violin

    • Ludwig van Beethoven
      Symphony No. 5 in C minor, op. 67

    Andris Nelsons and Baiba Skride Go to concert
  • Christmas concert: “Jingle Bass Rock”

    Christmas concert: “Jingle Bass Rock”

    The sound of Santa Claus is low, sonorous and dark. Fortunately, the orchestra deploys many instruments that can lend him musical form: double bass, double bassoon, bass clarinet, tuba and trombone. These low instruments take centre stage at our Christmas concert. Host Sarah Willis, horn player with the Berliner Philharmoniker, will create a great atmosphere, convey interesting facts about the bass instruments in an entertaining way, and get us in the mood for Christmas, together with members of the orchestra.

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    Family Christmas Concert

    Members of the Berliner Philharmoniker

    • Jingle Bass Rock

      Sarah Willis horn and presenter

    Christmas concert: “Jingle Bass Rock” Go to concert
  • Iván Fischer and Seong-Jin Cho

    Iván Fischer and Seong-Jin Cho

    Photo: Harald Hoffmann/DG

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Iván Fischer

    Seong-Jin Cho

    • Michail Glinka
      Ruslan and Lyudmila: Overture

    • Franz Liszt
      Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 2 in A major

      Seong-Jin Cho piano

    • Antonín Dvořák
      Symphony No. 8 in G minor, op. 88

    Iván Fischer and Seong-Jin Cho Go to concert
  • New Year’s Eve Concert with Kirill Petrenko and Pablo Sáinz-Villegas

    New Year’s Eve Concert with Kirill Petrenko and Pablo Sáinz-Villegas

    Be it Andalusian flamenco, which arose in exchange with Moorish traditions, passions unleashed in close contact to the Provence in France, or Latin America’s musical life, which flourishes at the other end of the Atlantic Ocean: the Berliner Philharmoniker’s New Year’s concert will bring the diversity of Spanish music to life. The virtuoso guitarist Pablo Sáinz Villegas will play Rodrigo’s Concierto de Aranjuez, and Kirill Petrenko will lead his orchestra into the new year with a programme full of atmosphere consisting of favourites and rediscoveries.

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    New Year’s Eve Concert

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    Pablo Sáinz-Villegas

    • Manuel de Falla
      El amor brujo: Introduction and “Ritual Fire Dance”

    • Joaquín Rodrigo
      Concierto de Aranjuez for guitar and orchestra

      Pablo Sáinz-Villegas guitar

    • Mozart Camargo Guarnieri
      3 Dances for Orchestra: Dansa Brasileira

    • Heitor Villa-Lobos
      Bachianas Brasileiras No. 4

    • Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov
      Capriccio espagnol, op. 34

    New Year’s Eve Concert with Kirill Petrenko and Pablo Sáinz-Villegas Go to concert
  • Semyon Bychkov and Lisa Batiashvili perform Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto

    Semyon Bychkov and Lisa Batiashvili perform Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto

    In accordance with one of our season emphases, this evening focuses on Russian music: Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto, composed after the composer experienced a phase of radical personal crises, is “unviolinistic”, Leopold Auer, to whom the work is dedicated, once stated. Lisa Batiashvili will make tangible that this is not the case at all. “The inhuman” is the theme of Shostakovich’s Eighth Symphony, completed in 1943: he describes the brutality of war, exposes the empty pomp of military deployments, and finds moving tones for humanity’s sorrow in the face of horrors.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Semyon Bychkov

    Lisa Batiashvili

    • Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
      Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in D major, op. 35

      Lisa Batiashvili violin

    • Dmitri Shostakovich
      Symphony No. 8 in C minor, op. 65

    Semyon Bychkov and Lisa Batiashvili perform Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto Go to concert
  • The National Youth Orchestra of Germany with Francesco Angelico and Christian Tetzlaff

    The National Youth Orchestra of Germany with Francesco Angelico and Christian Tetzlaff

    The National Youth Orchestra is under the Berliner Philharmoniker’s patronage. Its members, all highly talented instrumentalists between ages 14 and 19, gain their first experience in orchestral playing here – and at the highest level. During rehearsals they are coached by professional orchestra musicians. Being in the BJO means experiencing early on how it feels to perform on major concert stages. The annual guest performance in Berlin’s Philharmonie is a particular high point for the young people.

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    National Youth Orchestra of Germany
    Francesco Angelico

    Christian Tetzlaff

    • Luigi Dallapiccola
      Variations for Orchestra

    • Josef Suk
      Fantasy for Violin and Orchestra in G minor, op. 24

      Christian Tetzlaff violin

    • Dmitri Shostakovich
      Symphoy No. 11 in G minor, op. 103, “The Year 1905”

    The National Youth Orchestra of Germany with Francesco Angelico and Christian Tetzlaff Go to concert
  • Kirill Petrenko conducts Rachmaninov’s “Francesca da Rimini”

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Rachmaninov’s “Francesca da Rimini”

    In his third one-act opera, Rachmaninov set a historically authentic marital drama to music: a northern Italian noblewoman was discovered together with her lover by her jealous husband and murdered. This is a symphonically conceived operatic rarity perfectly made for the concert hall, since it can probably have the greatest impact as imaginary theatre. Hopeless tragedy also defines Shakespeare’s drama Romeo and Juliet, based on which Tchaikovsky composed his Overture-Fantasy of the same name. You are invited to discover the two seldom-heard works with Kirill Petrenko as conductor.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    Kristina Mkhitaryan, Dmytro Popov, Vladislav Sulimsky, Maxim Kuzmin-Karavaev, Dmitry Golovnin

    • Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
      Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy Overture after Shakespeare

    • Sergei Rachmaninov
      Francesca da Rimini, op. 25 (concert performance)

      Kristina Mkhitaryan soprano (Francesca), Dmytro Popov tenor (Paolo), Vladislav Sulimsky baritone (Lanceotto), Maxim Kuzmin-Karavaev bass (Vergil), Dmitry Golovnin tenor (Dante), Rundfunkchor Berlin

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Rachmaninov’s “Francesca da Rimini” Go to concert
  • Daniele Gatti conducts Stravinsky and Shostakovich

    Daniele Gatti conducts Stravinsky and Shostakovich

    On this programme you will experience two great Russian composers flirting with earlier epochs: Igor Stravinsky combines in his ballet Apollon musagète the cheerful light atmosphere of the classical era with the easy-going, urban lifestyle of the 1920s. Dmitri Shostakovich, on the other hand, composed his Fifth Symphony in 19th-century aesthetics of sound, ostensibly as a homage to socialism. But his music has a certain ambiguity: “The rejoicing is forced under threat,” the composer wrote. “One would have to be a complete fool not to hear that.”

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Daniele Gatti

    • Igor Stravinsky
      Apollon musagète

    • Dmitri Shostakovich
      Symphony No. 5 in D minor, op. 47

    Daniele Gatti conducts Stravinsky and Shostakovich Go to concert
  • Kirill Petrenko and Daniil Trifonov

    Kirill Petrenko and Daniil Trifonov

    “There’s this special moment when you truly feel the music and we all become one connected whole”, Daniil Trifonov waxes enthusiastical in an interview for the Digital Concert Hall. Since his debut in 2016, he has repeatedly bestowed such moments on the Philharmonic audience. Now he will perform Sergei Prokofiev’s youthful and exuberant Piano Concerto No. 1 with Kirill Petrenko in Berlin for the first time. Also on the programme: a première by Icelandic composer Anna Thorvaldsdóttir, and Erich Wolfgang Korngold’s Symphony in F sharp in colourful film music style, a great rarity.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    Daniil Trifonov

    • Anna Thorvaldsdóttir
      New work (première) – commissioned jointly by the Berliner Philharmoniker together with the Iceland Symphony Orchestra, the New York Philharmonic and the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra – supported by the Friends of the Berliner Philharmoniker e. V.

    • Sergei Prokofiev
      Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 1 in D flat major, op. 40

      Daniil Trifonov piano

    • Erich Wolfgang Korngold
      Symphony in F sharp, op. 40

    Kirill Petrenko and Daniil Trifonov Go to concert
  • Kirill Petrenko conducts Weill and Stravinsky

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Weill and Stravinsky

    Philharmonic Biennale: Kirill Petrenko brings the 1920s to life again with an early work by Kurt Weill. The influence of Liszt, Mahler and Strauss on Weill can be heard in his rarely performed First Symphony. The music is captivating, brash and brilliant, but also features delicate, chamber music-like passages. After the interval, we hear Stravinsky’s opera-oratorio Oedipus rex, composed in 1927 and set in ancient Greece. Its music is crystal-clear neoclassicism – how could it be otherwise? Two fascinating facets of the “Roaring Twenties”.

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    Philharmonic Biennale

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    Michael Spyres, Ekaterina Semenchuk

    • Kurt Weill
      Symphony No. 1 “Berliner Symphonie”

    • Igor Stravinsky
      Oedipus rex

      Michael Spyres tenor (Oedipus), Ekaterina Semenchuk mezzo-soprano (Jocasta), Shenyang bass-baritone (Creon), Andrea Mastroni bass (Tiresias), Krystian Adam tenor (Shepherd), Derek Welton bass (Messenger), Men of the Rundfunkchor Berlin

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Weill and Stravinsky Go to concert
  • Donald Runnicles conducts Hindemith and Weill

    Donald Runnicles conducts Hindemith and Weill

    Actor, director and author Simon McBurney is an artistic multitalent. For concert stages in Berlin, Los Angeles and San Francisco he directs a programme that leads us deep into the abysses of the 1920s, particularly in Hindemith’s operatic shocker Murderer, Hope of Women, which is based on a drama by Oskar Kokoschka. It is about sex and dark desires, brutality and murder. McBurney and his artistic team work with techniques such as video projections, thus creating an atmosphere which makes the social and political climate in the time of the Weimar Republic come alive.

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    Philharmonic Biennale

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Donald Runnicles

    Simon McBurney

    • Paul Hindemith
      Mörder, Hoffnung der Frauen (Murderer, Hope of Women), opera in one act, op.12

      Simon McBurney stage direction, Gerard McBurney dramaturgy, Will Duke video design, Anna Fleischle production design, Rundfunkchor Berlin

    • Kurt Weill
      The Berlin Requiem

      Simon McBurney stage direction, Gerard McBurney dramaturgy, Will Duke video design, Anna Fleischle production design, Rundfunkchor Berlin

    • Kurt Weill
      The Seven Deadly Sins

      Simon McBurney stage direction, Gerard McBurney dramaturgy, Will Duke video design, Anna Fleischle production design, Rundfunkchor Berlin

    Donald Runnicles conducts Hindemith and Weill Go to concert
  • Christian Thielemann conducts Liszt, Strauss and Bach

    Christian Thielemann conducts Liszt, Strauss and Bach

    Two lesser known masterworks of the Golden Twenties: as Arnold Schoenberg bathed Bach’s monumental Prelude and Fugue in the instrumental colours of a large symphony orchestra in early 1928, Richard Strauss had completed his latest work a few weeks earlier. The cycle Die Tageszeiten (The Times of Day), based on poems by Eichendorff, is in no way inferior to the beauty of the famous Vier letzte Lieder. After the interval the Dante Symphony by Franz Liszt, a composer who admired both Schoenberg and Strauss, offers a musical foretaste of the hereafter.

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    Philharmonic Biennale: “Late Night”

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Christian Thielemann

    Rundfunkchor Berlin

    • Johann Sebastian Bach
      Prelude and Fugue in E flat major, BWV 552 (orchestrated by Arnold Schoenberg)

    • Richard Strauss
      Die Tageszeiten, song cycle for male choir and orchestra, op. 76

      Rundfunkchor Berlin

    • Franz Liszt
      Dante Symphony

      Rundfunkchor Berlin

    Christian Thielemann conducts Liszt, Strauss and Bach Go to concert
  • “Late Night” concert: A night at the Moka Efti

    “Late Night” concert: A night at the Moka Efti

    The Philharmonie is transformed into the legendary coffee house Moka Efti for one night, when members of the Berliner Philharmoniker play dance music of the 1920s – foxtrots and shimmies, tangos, marches and blues ballads. Ernst Krenek’s Lustige Märsche (Merry Marches) provide the finale – wind music that literally seems to trip over its own feet: highly charged, breathless and wonderfully unconventional.

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    Philharmonic Biennale: “Late Night”

    Members of the Berliner Philharmoniker

    • Kurt Weill
      Berlin Lit Up

    • Kurt Weill
      Little Threepenny Music

    • Kurt Weill
      Panamanian Suite

    • Stefan Wolpe
      Suite from the Twenties

    • Mátyás Seiber
      Two Jazzolettes

    • Ernst Krenek
      Three Merry Marches, op. 44

    “Late Night” concert: A night at the Moka Efti Go to concert
  • Paavo Järvi and Igor Levit perform Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 5

    Paavo Järvi and Igor Levit perform Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 5

    A work that “really makes you happy”: that is how Igor Levit described Beethoven’s brilliant E flat major Piano Concerto, in which – amid the tension between individual and collective – the orchestra and solo part combine to form an integral whole. In contrast, sections of Prokofiev’s E flat minor Symphony are supposed to sound like “wind sweeping over a churchyard”. The slow middle movement alternates between aggressiveness and lament, while rhythmic interjections in the finale symbolize – in the words of the composer – “the forces of evil”. E flat major versus E flat minor: both works are in good hands with Paavo Järvi.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Paavo Järvi

    Igor Levit

    • Ludwig van Beethoven
      Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 5 in E flat major, op. 73

      Igor Levit piano

    • Sergei Prokofiev
      Symphony No. 6 in E flat minor, op. 111

    Paavo Järvi and Igor Levit perform Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 5 Go to concert
  • Kirill Petrenko conducts Tchaikovsky’s “Mazeppa”

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Tchaikovsky’s “Mazeppa”

    Like the opera Eugene Onegin, which he composed five years earlier, Pyotr Tchaikovsky’s Mazeppa is also based on a poem by Alexander Pushkin. The work tells the story of the tragic life and loves of a Ukrainian Cossack commander against the background of events during the reign of Peter the Great. After the opera is heard at the Easter Festival in Baden-Baden, the passionate, dramatic score will be brought to life by an outstanding ensemble of singers at the Philharmonie Berlin.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    Vladislav Sulimsky, Olga Peretyatko, Dmitry Ulyanov, Ekaterina Semenchuk

    • Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
      Mazeppa (concert performance)

      Vladislav Sulimsky baritone (Mazeppa), Olga Peretyatko soprano, Dmitry Ulyanov bass (Vasily Kochubey), Ekaterina Semenchuk mezzo-soprano (Lyubov Kochubey), Dmytro Popov tenor (Andrei), Vasily Gorshkov tenor (Iskra), Dimitry Ivashchenko bass (Filipp Orlik),

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Tchaikovsky’s “Mazeppa” Go to concert
  • Zubin Mehta conducts Bruckner’s Ninth Symphony

    Zubin Mehta conducts Bruckner’s Ninth Symphony

    They belonged to different stylistic periods but nevertheless had a great deal in common: Olivier Messiaen and Anton Bruckner numbered among the leading organists of their day, and both were deeply rooted in the Catholic faith, which considerably influenced their works. Zubin Mehta combines Messiaen’s Et exspecto resurrectionem mortuorum, an impressive musical memorial to the dead of both world wars, with Anton Bruckner’s monumental Ninth Symphony. In this work, Bruckner not only sums up his symphonic oeuvre but also bids farewell to this world in a very personal way.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Zubin Mehta

    • Olivier Messiaen
      Et exspecto resurrectionem mortuorum for wind orchestra and percussion

    • Anton Bruckner
      Symphony No. 9 in D minor

    Zubin Mehta conducts Bruckner’s Ninth Symphony Go to concert
  • Mikko Franck and Yefim Bronfman perform Brahms’s Piano Concerto No. 1

    Mikko Franck and Yefim Bronfman perform Brahms’s Piano Concerto No. 1

    One would never get the idea that virtuosity could be an end in itself with Yefim Bronfman, who has been a world-class pianist for many years. His artistry is always devoted to the work itself – regardless of whether he launches into a hard-hitting thunderstorm of chords or caresses delicate poetic tableaus out of the keys. “With Brahms I think of natural landscapes, mountains, green valleys and beautiful panoramas, of incredible grandeur,” Bronfman says about the composer, whose First Piano Concerto he plays at these concerts.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Mikko Franck

    Yefim Bronfman

    • Johannes Brahms
      Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 1 in D minor, op. 15

      Yefim Bronfman piano

    • Jean Sibelius
      Symphony No. 5 in E flat major, op. 82

    Mikko Franck and Yefim Bronfman perform Brahms’s Piano Concerto No. 1 Go to concert
  • Kirill Petrenko conducts Mozart and Tchaikovsky

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Mozart and Tchaikovsky

    Kirill Petrenko’s interpretation of music by Mozart will be heard together with Tchaikovsky’s Suite No. 3 during this concert, first in Berlin and afterwards at the European Concert. The annual anniversary concert of the Berliner Philharmoniker takes place at the Sagrada Família in Barcelona for the first time in 2021, with a selection of works tailor-made for the sacred location, including the “Coronation” Mass, the Ave verum and the motet “Exsultate, jubilate”. The Catalan choral society Orfeó Català, founded in 1891, makes its debut with the orchestra at these concerts.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    Rosa Feola

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      “Exsultate, jubilate”, motet, K. 165

      Rosa Feola soprano

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      Mass in C major, K. 317 “Coronation”

      Rosa Feola soprano, Wiebke Lehmkuhl contralto, Mauro Peter tenor, Krešimir Stražanac bass-baritone, Orfeó Català

    • Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
      Suite No. 3 in G major, op. 55

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Mozart and Tchaikovsky Go to concert
  • European Concert from Barcelona with Kirill Petrenko

    European Concert from Barcelona with Kirill Petrenko
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    European Concert from Barcelona

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    Kirill Petrenko, Rosa Feola, Wiebke Lehmkuhl, Mauro Peter, Krešimir Stražanac, Orfeó Català

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      Symphony No. 25 in G minor, K. 183

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      “Exsultate, jubilate”, motet, K. 165

      Rosa Feola soprano, Wiebke Lehmkuhl contralto, Mauro Peter tenor, Krešimir Stražanac bass-baritone, Orfeó Català choir

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      “Ave verum corpus”, motet K. 618

      Orfeó Català choir

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      Mass in C major, K. 317 “Coronation”

      Rosa Feola soprano, Wiebke Lehmkuhl contralto, Mauro Peter tenor, Krešimir Stražanac bass-baritone, Orfeó Català choir

    European Concert from Barcelona with Kirill Petrenko Go to concert
  • Kirill Petrenko conducts the BE PHIL Orchestra

    Kirill Petrenko conducts the BE PHIL Orchestra

    At 16,000 kilometres, Philipp Eversheim had the longest journey. The flutist from Australia was one of the approximately 90 music-loving amateurs who had qualified to participate in the BE PHIL Orchestra in 2018. This project of the Education Programme gave musicians from 30 countries the unique experience of performing Brahms’s First Symphony under Sir Simon Rattle. A highly emotional event for both the participants and the audience. This season there will be a revival of the BE PHIL Orchestra – with Shostakovich’s Tenth Symphony and chief conductor Kirill Petrenko at the podium.

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    BE PHIL Orchestra
    Kirill Petrenko

    • Dmitri Shostakovich
      Symphony No. 10 in E minor, op. 93

    Kirill Petrenko conducts the BE PHIL Orchestra Go to concert
  • Kirill Petrenko conducts Mahler’s Ninth Symphony

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Mahler’s Ninth Symphony

    “Each of Gustav Mahler’s symphonies has a different philosophy, builds a different world,” Kirill Petrenko says in an interview for the Digital Concert Hall. After the Fourth and the Sixth, he now conducts the Ninth, the composer’s last completed symphony, with the Berliner Philharmoniker. A work which makes a radical break with tradition, points the way to modernism and thus pushes open the door to a different world. Mahler conceived the cosmos of this work as fragile, fragmentary and episodic – a grand farewell to youth, love, life.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    • Gustav Mahler
      Symphony No. 9 in D major

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Mahler’s Ninth Symphony Go to concert
  • Susanna Mälkki conducts “Bluebeard’s Castle”

    Susanna Mälkki conducts “Bluebeard’s Castle”

    It is “a masterpiece, a musical volcano that erupts for sixty minutes of tragic intensity and leaves us with only one desire: to hear it again.” That is how Zoltán Kodály described Béla Bartók’s only opera, Bluebeard’s Castle. Composed in 1911, the one-act work is a brilliantly orchestrated symbolic psychological drama that takes us deep into the emotional world of the fin de siècle. “What do you see?” Bluebeard asks his bride Judith, who wants to open the seven doors of the Duke’s past. Susanna Mälkki conducts this musical psychoanalysis, which makes listeners shudder.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Susanna Mälkki

    Ildikó Komlósi, Johannes Martin Kränzle

    • Kaija Saariaho
      Vista (German première) – commissioned jointly by Berliner Philharmoniker Foundation together with the Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra, the Oslo Philharmonic and the Los Angeles Philharmonic Association (concert performance)

    • Béla Bartók
      Bluebeard’s Castle, Sz 48 (concert performance)

      Ildikó Komlósi mezzo-soprano (Judith), Johannes Martin Kränzle baritone (Bluebeard)

    Susanna Mälkki conducts “Bluebeard’s Castle” Go to concert
  • Simon Rattle conducts Elgar’s “The Dream of Gerontius”

    Simon Rattle conducts Elgar’s “The Dream of Gerontius”

    Sir Simon Rattle returns to the podium of the Berliner Philharmoniker with a major work by his countryman Edward Elgar. The Dream of Gerontius describes the journey of the soul of a dead man on its way to the next world. The work was composed in 1900, one year after Sigmund Freud published his epochal The Interpretation of Dreams. The dream as the gateway to the subconscious. In Elgar’s version, which is deeply indebted to the fin de siècle, the dream appears in the form of a comforting meditation on death.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Sir Simon Rattle

    Dame Sarah Connolly, Allan Clayton, Roderick Williams, Rundfunkchor Berlin

    • Edward Elgar
      The Dream of Gerontius, op. 38

      Dame Sarah Connolly mezzo-soprano, Allan Clayton tenor, Roderick Williams baritone, Rundfunkchor Berlin

    Simon Rattle conducts Elgar’s “The Dream of Gerontius” Go to concert
  • Alan Gilbert conducts Brahms, Chin and Webern

    Alan Gilbert conducts Brahms, Chin and Webern

    The early 20th century was not only influenced by avant-garde concepts but was also characterized by an unbridled passion for intoxicating sounds. Alan Gilbert, chief conductor of the NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchestra, demonstrates that in this programme. We can almost feel the gentle breeze that Anton Webern evokes in his impressionist early work Im Sommerwind (In the Summer Wind). And Arnold Schoenberg clearly took great pleasure in intensifying the colours of Brahms’s Piano Quartet No. 1, drawing on all the orchestra’s resources. Unsuk Chin’s iridescent, sensuous Piano Concerto will be heard between the two works, with Sunwook Kim as soloist.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Alan Gilbert

    Sunwook Kim

    • Anton Webern
      Im Sommerwind, Idyll for large orchestra

    • Unsuk Chin
      Concerto for Piano and Orchestra

      Sunwook Kim piano

    • Johannes Brahms
      Piano Quartet No. 1 in G minor, op. 25 (orchestrated by Arnold Schoenberg)

    Alan Gilbert conducts Brahms, Chin and Webern Go to concert
  • Herbert Blomstedt conducts Sibelius and Brahms

    Herbert Blomstedt conducts Sibelius and Brahms

    “Conducting is a good profession to grow old in, because it’s always a challenge, and you need challenges when you get older,” said Herbert Blomstedt, born in 1927, who is continuing his long-standing collaboration with the Berliner Philharmoniker with undiminished energy and vitality. On this programme Sibelius’s dark, mist-shrouded Fourth Symphony is contrasted with Brahms’s Third. Between them, a rarity will be heard: the solemn Intermezzo from the cantata Sången (The Song), composed in 1926 by the Swedish late Romantic composer Wilhelm Stenhammar.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Herbert Blomstedt

    • Jean Sibelius
      Symphony No. 4 in A minor, op. 63

    • Wilhelm Stenhammar
      Interlude from the Symphonic Cantata Sången, op. 44

    • Johannes Brahms
      Symphony No. 3 in F major, op. 90

    Herbert Blomstedt conducts Sibelius and Brahms Go to concert
  • Jean-Christophe Spinosi and Philippe Jaroussky

    Jean-Christophe Spinosi and Philippe Jaroussky

    Jean-Christophe Spinosi’s artistic home is music of the 17th and 18th centuries. He also appears as an opera conductor, with acclaimed interpretations of works by Mozart and Rossini. For his debut with the Berliner Philharmoniker Spinosi has put together a varied programme including two works from the Baroque period, a symphony from the Viennese Classical School and Romantic bel canto. Philippe Jaroussky is also at home in this repertoire and contributes arias by Vivaldi and Rossini in his brilliant countertenor.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Jean-Christophe Spinosi

    Philippe Jaroussky

    • Antonio Vivaldi
      Sinfonia from L'Olimpiade, RV 725

    • Antonio Vivaldi
      Aria “Mentre dormi amor fomenti” from L'Olimpiade, RV 725

      Philippe Jaroussky countertenor

    • Georg Philipp Telemann
      Concerto in E minor for Flute, Recorder, Strings and Continuo, TWV 52:e1

    • Antonio Vivaldi
      Aria “Gemo in un punto e fremo” from L'Olimpiade, RV 725

      Philippe Jaroussky countertenor

    • Joseph Haydn
      Symphony No. 82 in C major “L’Ours”

    • Gioacchino Rossini
      Overture to L’Italiana in Algeri

    • Gioacchino Rossini
      Cavatina “Di tanti palpiti” from Tancredi

      Philippe Jaroussky countertenor

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      Symphony No. 41 in C major, K. 551 “Jupiter”

    Jean-Christophe Spinosi and Philippe Jaroussky Go to concert
  • Concert from the Waldbühne with Martin Grubinger

    Concert from the Waldbühne with Martin Grubinger

    At his debut with the orchestra in March of 2019 listeners could experience the presence, physicality and enthusiasm with which multi-percussionist Martin Grubinger executed the solo part in Peter Eötvös’s percussion concerto Speaking Drums. He virtuosically elicited a wealth of timbres from his arsenal of instruments – from eruptive cascades of sound to delicate bell tones. At the close of the concert season in the Waldbühne the percussion star returns to the Berliner Philharmoniker: pure rhythm under the stars.

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    From the Berlin Waldbühne

    Berliner Philharmoniker

    Martin Grubinger

    • Programme and conductor to be announced

      Martin Grubinger drums

    Concert from the Waldbühne with Martin Grubinger Go to concert