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Live concerts

  • Jean-Christophe Spinosi and Philippe Jaroussky

    Jean-Christophe Spinosi and Philippe Jaroussky

    Jean-Christophe Spinosi’s artistic home is music of the 17th and 18th centuries. He also appears as an opera conductor, with acclaimed interpretations of works by Mozart and Rossini. For his debut with the Berliner Philharmoniker Spinosi has put together a varied programme including two works from the Baroque period, a symphony from the Viennese Classical School and Romantic bel canto. Philippe Jaroussky is also at home in this repertoire and contributes arias by Vivaldi and Rossini in his brilliant countertenor.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Jean-Christophe Spinosi

    Philippe Jaroussky

    • Antonio Vivaldi
      Aria “Vedrò con mio diletto” from Il Giustino, RV 725

      Philippe Jaroussky countertenor

    • Antonio Vivaldi
      Aria “Gemo in un punto e fremo” from L’Olimpiade, RV 725

      Philippe Jaroussky countertenor

    • Joseph Haydn
      Symphony No. 82 in C major “L’Ours”

    • Gioacchino Rossini
      Cavatina “Di tanti palpiti” from Tancredi

      Philippe Jaroussky countertenor

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      Symphony No. 41 in C major, K. 551 “Jupiter”

    Jean-Christophe Spinosi and Philippe Jaroussky Go to concert
  • Repeat: Jean-Christophe Spinosi and Philippe Jaroussky

    Repeat: Jean-Christophe Spinosi and Philippe Jaroussky

    Jean-Christophe Spinosi’s artistic home is music of the 17th and 18th centuries. He also appears as an opera conductor, with acclaimed interpretations of works by Mozart and Rossini. For his debut with the Berliner Philharmoniker Spinosi has put together a varied programme including two works from the Baroque period, a symphony from the Viennese Classical School and Romantic bel canto. Philippe Jaroussky is also at home in this repertoire and contributes arias by Vivaldi and Rossini in his brilliant countertenor.

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    Repeat

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Jean-Christophe Spinosi

    Philippe Jaroussky

    • Antonio Vivaldi
      Aria «Vedrò con mio diletto» de la ópera Il Giustino RV 725

      Philippe Jaroussky countertenor

    • Antonio Vivaldi
      Aria “Gemo in un punto e fremo” from L’Olimpiade, RV 725

      Philippe Jaroussky countertenor

    • Joseph Haydn
      Symphony No. 82 in C major “L’Ours”

    • Gioacchino Rossini
      Cavatina “Di tanti palpiti” from Tancredi

      Philippe Jaroussky countertenor

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      Symphony No. 41 in C major, K. 551 “Jupiter”

    Repeat: Jean-Christophe Spinosi and Philippe Jaroussky Go to concert
  • Concert from the Waldbühne with Martin Grubinger

    Concert from the Waldbühne with Martin Grubinger

    Photo: Simon Pauly

    At his debut with the orchestra in March of 2019 listeners could experience the presence, physicality and enthusiasm with which multi-percussionist Martin Grubinger executed the solo part in Peter Eötvös’s percussion concerto Speaking Drums. He virtuosically elicited a wealth of timbres from his arsenal of instruments – from eruptive cascades of sound to delicate bell tones. At the close of the concert season in the Waldbühne the percussion star returns to the Berliner Philharmoniker: pure rhythm under the stars.

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    From the Berlin Waldbühne

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Wayne Marshall

    Martin Grubinger

    • Leonard Bernstein
      On the Town: 3 Dance Episodes

    • John Williams
      Percussive Planet

      Martin Grubinger drums

    • George Gershwin
      Rhapsody in Blue (orch. Ferde Grofé)

    • Leonard Bernstein
      On the Waterfront, Symphonic Suite

    Concert from the Waldbühne with Martin Grubinger Go to concert
  • Season opening: Kirill Petrenko conducts Schubert’s “Great” C major Symphony

    Season opening: Kirill Petrenko conducts Schubert’s “Great” C major Symphony

    Photo: Stephan Rabold

    Kirill Petrenko opens the new season of the Berliner Philharmoniker with the enchanting and mysterious world of Romanticism. The main work on the programme is Franz Schubert’s “Great” C major Symphony, in which exuberance, dance and nobility are shaken by moments of deep despair. Carl Maria von Weber transports us to the magical realm of Oberon, the king of the elves, which inspired Paul Hindemith’s colourful Symphonic Metamorphosis.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    • Carl Maria von Weber
      Oberon: Overture

    • Paul Hindemith
      Symphonic Metamorphosis of themes by Carl Maria von Weber

    • Franz Schubert
      Symphony No. 8 in C major, D 944 “Great”

    Season opening: Kirill Petrenko conducts Schubert’s “Great” C major Symphony Go to concert
  • Jakub Hrůša conducts Bruckner’s Fourth and a world premiere

    Jakub Hrůša conducts Bruckner’s Fourth and a world premiere

    Photo: Pavel Hejny

    Bruckner’s “Romantic” Fourth Symphony has a distinct feeling of longing and closeness to nature – for instance, in the horn call at the beginning and the melancholy singing of the strings. The work is conducted by Jakub Hrůša, who also presents the world premiere of Keyframes for a Hippogriff by Olga Neuwirth, one of the most sought-after composers of our time. Neuwirth says the work is about trying “to remain a free soul despite the despair and pain in this world”.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Jakub Hrůša

    Andrew Watts, Children’s Choir of the Staatsoper Unter den Linden Berlin

    • Olga Neuwirth
      Keyframes for a Hippogriff − Musical Calligrams in memoriam Hester Diamond, commissioned jontly by the Berliner Philharmoniker Foundation, the New York Philharmonic and the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra (premiere)

      Andrew Watts countertenor, Children’s Choir of the Staatsoper Unter den Linden Berlin

    • Anton Bruckner
      Symphony No. 4 in E flat major “Romantic” (2nd version from 1878/1880)

    Jakub Hrůša conducts Bruckner’s Fourth and a world premiere Go to concert
  • Kirill Petrenko and Patricia Kopatchinskaja with works by Hartmann and Stravinsky

    Kirill Petrenko and Patricia Kopatchinskaja with works by Hartmann and Stravinsky

    Few works have captured the horror of the Nazi regime as powerfully in music as Karl Amadeus Hartmann’s Concerto funebre. The soloist in this performance with Kirill Petrenko is Artist in Residence Patricia Kopatchinskaja. The concert closes with the striking ballet music from The Firebird by Igor Stravinsky. The two composers, who admired each other, both strived towards uncompromisingly modern yet moving music.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    Patricia Kopatchinskaja

    • Karl Amadeus Hartmann
      Concerto funebre for violin and strings

      Patricia Kopatchinskaja violin

    • Igor Stravinsky
      L’Oiseau de feu (The Firebird), Ballet Music

    Kirill Petrenko and Patricia Kopatchinskaja with works by Hartmann and Stravinsky Go to concert
  • Tugan Sokhiev and Nikolai Lugansky

    Tugan Sokhiev and Nikolai Lugansky

    Photo: Marco Borggreve

    In this concert, Tugan Sokhiev presents three melodious discoveries: Ernest Chausson’s Symphony in B flat major, which the orchestra last performed in 1975. This work features shimmering French colours and a great lamento influenced by Wagner. Other rarities are Rimsky-Korsakov’s folklike overture to the opera The Tsar’s Bride and the First Piano Concerto by the 17-year-old Sergei Rachmaninov, with Nikolai Lugansky as soloist.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Tugan Sokhiev

    Nikolai Lugansky

    • Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov
      The Tsar’s Bride: Overture

    • Sergei Rachmaninov
      Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 1 in F sharp minor, op. 1

      Nikolai Lugansky piano

    • Ernest Chausson
      Symphony in B flat major, op. 20

    Tugan Sokhiev and Nikolai Lugansky Go to concert
  • Herbert Blomstedt conducts Bruckner’s Fifth Symphony

    Herbert Blomstedt conducts Bruckner’s Fifth Symphony

    Photo: Martin U. K. Lengemann

    Bruckner’s Fifth Symphony is the documentation of an existential crisis. At the time of its composition, the 50-year-old composer was not accepted as an artist, nor had he found the desperately longed-for wife. With the confident architecture of the Finale and its solemn orchestral chorales, the Symphony displays more defiance than despair, however. It will be conducted by Herbert Blomstedt, one of the outstanding Bruckner interpreters of our time.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Herbert Blomstedt

    • Anton Bruckner
      Symphony No. 5 in B flat major (Nowak Edition)

    Herbert Blomstedt conducts Bruckner’s Fifth Symphony Go to concert
  • Gustavo Gimeno and Augustin Hadelich make their debuts

    Gustavo Gimeno and Augustin Hadelich make their debuts

    Photo: Marco Borggreve

    Rimsky-Korsakov’s Scheherazade is fascinating because of the contrast between the brutal sultan and the clever title heroine. The composer’s vision of the Orient sounds splendid – it is not surprising that he was a sought-after teacher of orchestration. One of his students was Prokofiev, who acquired from him a fondness for Russian folk melodies, as we hear in his Second Violin Concerto. Both conductor Gustavo Gimeno and violinist Augustin Hadelich make their debuts.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Gustavo Gimeno

    Augustin Hadelich

    • György Ligeti
      Concert Românesc

    • Sergei Prokofiev
      Concerto for Violin and Orchestra No. 2 in G minor, op. 63

      Augustin Hadelich violin

    • Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov
      Scheherazade, Symphonic Suite, op. 35

    Gustavo Gimeno and Augustin Hadelich make their debuts Go to concert
  • John Williams conducts John Williams

    John Williams conducts John Williams

    Photo: Todd Rosenberg

    The history of film music would be different without John Williams. Cinema classics like Star Wars, Indiana Jones and Harry Potter are inextricably linked with his musical style. His soundtracks captivate listeners with thrilling, moving themes and a tremendous range of atmospheres and sounds. John Williams makes his debut with the Berliner Philharmoniker at this concert, conducting several of his most famous scores.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    John Williams

    • John Williams
      Film music from Indiana Jones, E. T., Superman, Harry Potter, Star Wars and other movies

    • John Williams
      Elegy for cello and orchestra

      Bruno Delepelaire cello

    John Williams conducts John Williams Go to concert
  • Adam Fischer conducts Mozart and Haydn

    Adam Fischer conducts Mozart and Haydn

    Adam Fischer is a conductor with an exceptional feeling for Viennese Classicism. That was already obvious at a concert devoted to Mozart and Haydn with the Philharmoniker in 2019. This time we will hear Mozart’s exuberant Symphony No. 33 and the Kyrie in D minor, an anticipation of the Requiem. Fischer also presents Haydn’s choral scene The Tempest and his penultimate symphony, which surprises listeners with a timpani roll at the beginning.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Adam Fischer

    Rundfunkchor Berlin

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      Symphony No. 33 in B flat major, K. 319

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      Kyrie in D minor, K. 341

      Rundfunkchor Berlin

    • Joseph Haydn
      The Storm for choir and orchestra, Hob. XXIVa:8

      Rundfunkchor Berlin

    • Joseph Haydn
      Symphony No. 103 in E flat major “Drumroll”

    Adam Fischer conducts Mozart and Haydn Go to concert
  • Kirill Petrenko conducts Mendelssohn and Shostakovich

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Mendelssohn and Shostakovich

    Photo: Monika Rittershaus

    In this programme, Kirill Petrenko first takes us to Great Britain. Inspired by a visit to Scotland, Mendelssohn composed his atmospherically dense Third Symphony. Shostakovich’s Tenth Symphony – the first he wrote after Stalin’s death in 1953 – is programmatically very different. The composer makes the repression of the Stalin era palpable with oppressive, often grotesque music, before closing with a movement full of hope.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    • Felix Mendelssohn
      Symphony No. 3 in A minor, op. 56 “Scottish”

    • Dmitri Shostakovich
      Symphony No. 10 in E minor, op. 93

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Mendelssohn and Shostakovich Go to concert
  • Semyon Bychkov conducts Mahler’s Fourth and a new work by Thomas Larcher

    Semyon Bychkov conducts Mahler’s Fourth and a new work by Thomas Larcher

    Photo: Sheila Rock

    Mahler’s Fourth occupies a special place among his symphonies because of its delicate transparency: a sunny idyll that seems to be faced with a constant threat, however. “It contains the cheerfulness of a higher and, for us, unfamiliar world that holds something eerie and horrifying,” Mahler said. The conductor of this performance is Semyon Bychkov; also on the programme is a new piano concerto by Thomas Larcher, with Kirill Gerstein as soloist.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Semyon Bychkov

    Kirill Gerstein, Chen Reiss

    • Thomas Larcher
      Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, commissioned jointly by the Berliner Philharmoniker Foundation, Česká filharmonie, Wiener Konzerthaus, Nederlandse Publieke Omroep, BBC Radio 3, Danish National Symphony Orchestra and Bergen Filharmoniske Orkester

      Kirill Gerstein piano

    • Gustav Mahler
      Symphony No. 4 in G major

      Chen Reiss soprano

    Semyon Bychkov conducts Mahler’s Fourth and a new work by Thomas Larcher Go to concert
  • Andris Nelsons conducts Stravinsky’s “Le Sacre du printemps”

    Andris Nelsons conducts Stravinsky’s “Le Sacre du printemps”

    Photo: Marco Borggreve

    You think 20th-century music is complicated? Andris Nelsons demonstrates the contrary in this programme. Although Stravinsky’s Le Sacre du printemps turned the music world upside down at the premiere, the elemental force of its strongly rhythmic tonal language is conveyed spontaneously. The trumpet concerto by Mieczysław Weinberg is a discovery: a work of sparkling virtuosity and irony, with the Swedish trumpeter Håkan Hardenberger as soloist.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Andris Nelsons

    Håkan Hardenberger

    • Mieczysław Weinberg
      Concerto for Trumpet and Orchestra, op. 94

      Håkan Hardenberger trumpet

    • Igor Stravinsky
      Le Sacre du printemps

    Andris Nelsons conducts Stravinsky’s “Le Sacre du printemps” Go to concert
  • Zubin Mehta conducts Mahler’s Third Symphony

    Zubin Mehta conducts Mahler’s Third Symphony

    “Real horror” seized Gustav Mahler when he realized the enormous dimensions of his Third Symphony. The vastness of the work was consistent with his spiritual conception, however, since nothing less than “the entire world” was to be mirrored in the symphony. At the close is a poignant hymn to love. The conductor is Zubin Mehta, who was introduced to this musical cosmos by Mahler’s assistant Bruno Walter.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Zubin Mehta

    Okka von der Damerau, Ladies of the Rundfunkchor Berlin, Boys of the Berlin State and Cathedral Choir

    • Gustav Mahler
      Symphony No. 3 in D minor

      Okka von der Damerau mezzo-soprano, Ladies of the Rundfunkchor Berlin, Boys of the Berlin State and Cathedral Choir

    Zubin Mehta conducts Mahler’s Third Symphony Go to concert
  • New Year’s Eve Concert with Kirill Petrenko and Janine Jansen

    New Year’s Eve Concert with Kirill Petrenko and Janine Jansen

    Photo: Marco Borggreve

    The Berliner Philharmoniker and chief conductor Kirill Petrenko say goodbye to 2021 with a different style of Viennese dance music. Incidental music by Erich Wolfgang Korngold enriches a Shakespeare comedy with Viennese charm, Richard Strauss celebrates café culture in his ballet Schlagobers (Whipped Cream), while Maurice Ravel offers an ecstatic version of the Viennese waltz in La Valse. Another highlight is Max Bruch’s First Violin Concerto with Janine Jansen.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    Janine Jansen

    • Erich Wolfgang Korngold
      Incidental Music to Much ado about nothing: Overture

    • Max Bruch
      Concerto for Violin and Orchestra No. 1 in G minor, op. 26

      Janine Jansen violin

    • Richard Strauss
      Schlagobers, Orchestral Suite: In der Konditorküche (In the Confectioner’s Shop), March

    • Richard Strauss
      Schlagobers, Orchestral Suite: Schlagobers Waltz

    • Richard Strauss
      Schlagobers, Orchestral Suite: Finale, General Dance

    • Fritz Kreisler
      Liebesleid (Love’s Sorrow)

      Janine Jansen violin

    • Maurice Ravel
      La Valse

    New Year’s Eve Concert with Kirill Petrenko and Janine Jansen Go to concert
  • Daniel Barenboim conducts Verdi

    Daniel Barenboim conducts Verdi

    Photo: Peter Adamik

    Daniel Barenboim has conducted acclaimed performances of the great Verdi operas. In this concert, he introduces works by the composer which were not initially intended for publication and offer insights into Verdi’s emotional life. The first work is his only string quartet, in a version for orchestra, in which operatic intensity is combined with elegance and melancholy. We also hear Verdi’s expressive Quattro pezzi sacri.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Daniel Barenboim

    Rundfunkchor Berlin

    • Giuseppe Verdi
      Les Vêpres siciliennes: Overture

    • Giuseppe Verdi
      String Quartet in E minor (version for string orchestra)

    • Giuseppe Verdi
      Quattro pezzi sacri

      Rundfunkchor Berlin

    Daniel Barenboim conducts Verdi Go to concert
  • Kirill Petrenko conducts Tchaikovsky’s “Iolanta”

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Tchaikovsky’s “Iolanta”

    Photo: Victor Santiago

    Peter Tchaikovsky’s last opera, Iolanta, is tender, magical and ambiguous. The focus of the story is a blind princess, who regains her sight through love – a rare happy ending in 19th-century opera. Tchaikovsky composed poetic music for the work, in which we also hear his love for French opera. This unjustly forgotten treasure will be presented in a performance with Kirill Petrenko and Sonya Yoncheva in the title role.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    Sonya Yoncheva

    • Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
      Iolanta, lyric opera in one act, op. 69 (concert performance)

      Sonya Yoncheva soprano (Iolanta), Mika Kares bass (King René), Liparit Avetisyan tenor (Vaudémont), Igor Golovatenko baritone (Robert), Michael Kraus baritone (Ibn-Hakia), Olga Pudova soprano (Brigitta), Victoria Karkacheva mezzo-soprano (Laura), Margarita Nekrasova contralto (Martha), Dmitry Ivanchey tenor (Alméric), Nikolay Didenko baritone (Bertrand), Rundfunkchor Berlin

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Tchaikovsky’s “Iolanta” Go to concert
  • Philippe Jordan conducts Strauss’s “Alpine Symphony”

    Philippe Jordan conducts Strauss’s “Alpine Symphony”

    Photo: Johannes Ifkovits

    When a storm erupts during an orchestral work, there is a moment of overwhelming energy, followed by relief. Philippe Jordan conducts two powerful works in which such scenes occur: Richard Strauss’s Eine Alpensymphonie and excerpts from Wagner’s Rheingold. Expressive power is also unleashed with a blizzard and a thunderstorm in Alban Berg’s Altenberg Lieder. The soloist is Anja Kampe, who has enjoyed worldwide success as a Wagner interpreter.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Philippe Jordan

    Anja Kampe

    • Richard Wagner
      Das Rheingold: Orchestral Excerpts, compiled by Philippe Jordan

    • Alban Berg
      Five Orchestral Songs on postcards texts by Peter Altenberg, op. 4

      Anja Kampe soprano

    • Richard Strauss
      Eine Alpensinfonie (An Alpine Symphony), op. 64

    Philippe Jordan conducts Strauss’s “Alpine Symphony” Go to concert
  • Kirill Petrenko conducts Zimmermann, Lutosławski and Brahms

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Zimmermann, Lutosławski and Brahms

    Anyone who wants to continue the symphonic tradition must have self-confidence and creativity. In this concert, Kirill Petrenko presents two composers who took this risk: we hear Witold Lutosławski’s splendidly virtuosic Symphony No. 1 and the Janus-faced Second Symphony by Johannes Brahms, which the composer himself described as a “lovely monster”. The concert opens with Bernd Alois Zimmermann’s sound surface composition Photoptosis.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    • Bernd Alois Zimmermann
      Photoptosis, Prélude for large orchestra

    • Witold Lutosławski
      Symphony No.1

    • Johannes Brahms
      Symphony No. 2 in D major, op. 73

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Zimmermann, Lutosławski and Brahms Go to concert
  • Kirill Petrenko and András Schiff with works by Brahms and Suk

    Kirill Petrenko and András Schiff with works by Brahms and Suk

    Photo: Nicolas Brodard

    One of Kirill Petrenko’s priorities is to introduce the music of Josef Suk to a larger audience. At this concert, he presents the symphonic poem Ripening, which combines late Romantic tonal splendour with modern harmony. Johannes Brahms was a supporter of Suk. We hear Brahms’s Second Piano Concerto, in which brusque force and tender feelings collide. The soloist is Sir András Schiff, a long-time partner of the Berliner Philharmoniker.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    Sir András Schiff, Ladies of the Rundfunkchor Berlin

    • Johannes Brahms
      Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 2 in B flat major, op. 83

      Sir András Schiff piano

    • Josef Suk
      The Ripening, Symphonic Poem for orchestra and female choir, op. 34

      Ladies of the Rundfunkchor Berlin

    Kirill Petrenko and András Schiff with works by Brahms and Suk Go to concert
  • Gustavo Dudamel conducts Mahler’s Second Symphony

    Gustavo Dudamel conducts Mahler’s Second Symphony

    Photo: Danny Clinch

    “Why have you lived? Why have you suffered?” These are elemental questions that Gustav Mahler raises in his Second Symphony. He summons up impressive forces with chorus and orchestra. Grotesque humour and yearning solo voices are also heard within this immense expressive spectrum. The conductor is Gustavo Dudamel, who has appeared regularly with the Berliner Philharmoniker as a Mahler interpreter and thrills listeners with his enthusiasm and precision.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Gustavo Dudamel

    Nadine Sierra, Marianne Crebassa, Rundfunkchor Berlin

    • Gustav Mahler
      Symphony No. 2 in C minor “Resurrection”

      Nadine Sierra soprano, Marianne Crebassa mezzo-soprano, Rundfunkchor Berlin

    Gustavo Dudamel conducts Mahler’s Second Symphony Go to concert
  • François-Xavier Roth and Albrecht Mayer

    François-Xavier Roth and Albrecht Mayer

    Photo: Marco Borggreve

    Igor Stravinsky was a composer of the avant-garde, but he also took up the legacy of music history. François-Xavier Roth presents both sides: first, the groundbreaking ballet Petrushka, which combines a fairground atmosphere with a visionary musical idiom. In his charming Divertimento, on the other hand, Stravinsky pays his respects to Tchaikovsky’s ballets. No less graceful is Bach’s Oboe Concerto in A major, with the orchestra’s principal oboe, Albrecht Mayer.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    François-Xavier Roth

    Albrecht Mayer

    • Igor Stravinsky
      Divertimento, orchestral suite after the ballet Le Baiser de la fée

    • Johann Sebastian Bach
      Concerto for Oboe d’amore, Strings and Basso continuo in A major, BWV 1055R

      Albrecht Mayer oboe d’amore

    • Igor Stravinsky
      Petrushka

    François-Xavier Roth and Albrecht Mayer Go to concert
  • Daniel Barenboim conducts Verdi’s Requiem

    Daniel Barenboim conducts Verdi’s Requiem

    Photo: Peter Adamik

    Hans von Bülow, the first chief conductor of the Berliner Philharmoniker, was deeply moved: “Even in a rather mediocre performance,” he wrote to Giuseppe Verdi, his Requiem had “moved me to tears”. The work does, in fact, have an emotional immediacy that is unusual for liturgical music – for example, in the Dies Irae, which depicts a shattering apocalypse. This performance will be led by Daniel Barenboim, honorary conductor of the Berliner Philharmoniker.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Daniel Barenboim

    Elena Stikhina, Anita Rachvelishvili, Fabio Sartori, René Pape, Rundfunkchor Berlin

    • Giuseppe Verdi
      Messa da Requiem

      Elena Stikhina soprano, Anita Rachvelishvili mezzo-soprano, Fabio Sartori tenor, René Pape bass, Rundfunkchor Berlin

    Daniel Barenboim conducts Verdi’s Requiem Go to concert
  • John Eliot Gardiner conducts Brahms and Mendelssohn

    John Eliot Gardiner conducts Brahms and Mendelssohn

    Photo: Sim Canetty-Clarke

    John Eliot Gardiner and his Monteverdi Choir present two key choral works from the Romantic period. During this era, spiritual music was intended to edify. Johannes Brahms does that in his dramatic Schicksalslied by reinterpreting Hölderlin’s resigned text with an optimistic epilogue. Mendelssohn’s Second Symphony, on the other hand, shows the way from darkness into the radiant vision of a better world with melodious choruses, duets and arias.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Sir John Eliot Gardiner

    Monteverdi Choir, Lucy Crowe, Ann Hallenberg, Werner Güra

    • Johannes Brahms
      Schicksalslied, op. 54

      Monteverdi Choir

    • Felix Mendelssohn
      Symphony No. 2 in B flat major, op. 52 “Hymn of Praise”

      Lucy Crowe soprano, Ann Hallenberg mezzo-soprano, Werner Güra tenor, Monteverdi Choir

    John Eliot Gardiner conducts Brahms and Mendelssohn Go to concert
  • Kirill Petrenko conducts Tchaikovsky’s “Queen of Spades”

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Tchaikovsky’s “Queen of Spades”

    Photo: Monika Rittershaus

    No opera demonstrates more vividly than Peter Tchaikovsky’s The Queen of Spades the fact that people’s desires are often their undoing. The outsider Herman strives for success at cards but loses everything in the end. Lisa searches for her great love, is disappointed and takes her life. There is also a mysterious countess. Kirill Petrenko conducts the passionate music Tchaikovsky composed for this dark tale.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    • Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
      The Queen of Spades, opera in three acts, op. 68 (concert performance)

      Arsen Soghomonyan tenor (Herman), Vladislav Sulimsky baritone (Count Tomsky), Boris Pinkhasovich baritone (Prince Yeletsky), Doris Soffel contralto (Countess), Asmik Grigorian soprano (Liza), Aigul Akhmetshina mezzo-soprano (Polina), Slovac Philharmonic Choir

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Tchaikovsky’s “Queen of Spades” Go to concert
  • Antonello Manacorda and Christian Gerhaher

    Antonello Manacorda and Christian Gerhaher

    Photo: Nikolaj Lund

    Antonello Manacorda is at home in the great opera houses. As chief conductor of the Kammerakademie Potsdam, he has also made award-winning recordings, including the complete Schubert symphonies. Rarely has this music sounded “leaner, more logical, more exhilarating”, Der Spiegel wrote. For his debut with the Philharmoniker, Manacorda has programmed Schubert’s “Unfinished”. A further highlight is Mahler’s Rückert-Lieder, with baritone Christian Gerhaher.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Antonello Manacorda

    Christian Gerhaher

    • Ludwig van Beethoven
      Coriolan, overture in C minor, op. 62

    • Gustav Mahler
      Rückert-Lieder

      Christian Gerhaher baritone

    • Arnold Schoenberg
      Chamber Symphony No. 2 in E flat minor for Small Orchestra, op. 38

    • Franz Schubert
      Symphony No. 7 in B minor, D 759 “Unfinished”

    Antonello Manacorda and Christian Gerhaher Go to concert
  • Anniversary concert of the Karajan Academy with Kirill Petrenko

    Anniversary concert of the Karajan Academy with Kirill Petrenko

    Photo: Peter Adamik

    The Karajan Academy celebrates its 50th anniversary at this concert, together with members of the Berliner Philharmoniker. Conducting scholar Nodoka Okisawa opens the concert with Mozart’s “Linz” Symphony. Kirill Petrenko conducts Beethoven’s celebrated Fifth Symphony and a world premiere by Donghoon Shin. The soloist is the former Academy scholar and now 1st principal cello of the Philharmoniker, Bruno Delepelaire.

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    Karajan Academy of the Berliner Philharmoniker

    Nodoka Okisawa, Kirill Petrenko, Bruno Delepelaire

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      Symphony No. 36 in C major, K. 425 “Linz”

      Nodoka Okisawa conductor

    • Donghoon Shin
      Work for Cello and Orchestra, commissioned for the Claudio Abbado Composition Prize

      Kirill Petrenko conductor, Bruno Delepelaire cello

    • Ludwig van Beethoven
      Symphony No. 5 in C minor, op. 67

      Kirill Petrenko conductor

    Anniversary concert of the Karajan Academy with Kirill Petrenko Go to concert
  • Simon Rattle conducts Roberto Gerhard and Antonín Dvořák

    Simon Rattle conducts Roberto Gerhard and Antonín Dvořák

    Photo: Oliver Helbig

    During his tenure as chief conductor of the Berliner Philharmoniker, Simon Rattle frequently presented Dvořák rarities. The graceful yet dramatic Scherzo capriccioso will be heard at this concert. For the first time the orchestra plays Dvořák’s “American” Suite, whose affinity with the Symphony “From the New World” is unmistakable. Another novelty is music by Roberto Gerhard, a student of Schoenberg, whose works combine avant-garde and Spanish sounds.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Sir Simon Rattle

    • Roberto Gerhard
      Dances from Don Quixote

    • Roberto Gerhard
      Symphony No. 3 “Collages”

    • Antonín Dvořák
      Scherzo capriccioso, op. 66

    • Antonín Dvořák
      Suite for Orchestra in A major, op. 98b “American”

    Simon Rattle conducts Roberto Gerhard and Antonín Dvořák Go to concert
  • Simon Rattle conducts Haydn and Stravinsky

    Simon Rattle conducts Haydn and Stravinsky

    Photo: Oliver Helbig

    “I’m crazy about Haydn,” Simon Rattle once said. And in fact, there are few other conductors with such a deep understanding of this composer. During this concert, Sir Simon conducts the Symphony No. 102, which is striking because of its heartfelt slow movement. Igor Stravinsky is also extremely important to Simon Rattle, who presents unfamiliar facets of the composer with a Stravinsky Journey he compiled himself.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Sir Simon Rattle

    Anna Lapkovskaja

    • Joseph Haydn
      Symphony No. 102 in B flat major

    • Igor Stravinsky
      Strawinsky Journey, arranged by Sir Simon Rattle

      Anna Lapkovskaja mezzo-soprano

    • Igor Stravinsky
      Requiem Canticles (Excerpts)

      Anna Lapkovskaja mezzo-soprano

    Simon Rattle conducts Haydn and Stravinsky Go to concert
  • Paavo Järvi and Emmanuel Pahud

    Paavo Järvi and Emmanuel Pahud

    Photo: Kaupo Kikkas

    His highly acclaimed recordings prove it: for Paavo Järvi, Beethoven is not simply an overpowering titan, Sibelius not merely a Nordic melancholiac – instead, he conveys the youthful power of this music. Järvi conducts Beethoven’s Eighth and Sibelius’s Seventh Symphony at this concert. In addition, Emmanuel Pahud gives the world premiere of a flute concerto by Erkki-Sven Tüür. The music of the Estonian composer and former rock musician is atmospheric and energetic.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Paavo Järvi

    Emmanuel Pahud

    • Jean Sibelius
      Symphony No. 7 in C major, op. 105

    • Erkki-Sven Tüür
      Concerto for Flute and Orchestra, commissioned by the Berliner Philharmoniker Foundation together with the Tonhalle Zürich (premiere)

      Emmanuel Pahud flute

    • Ludwig van Beethoven
      Symphony No. 8 in F major, op. 93

    Paavo Järvi and Emmanuel Pahud Go to concert
  • John Storgårds conducts Bruckner’s Sixth and a world premiere

    John Storgårds conducts Bruckner’s Sixth and a world premiere

    Photo: Marco Borggreve

    Anton Bruckner wrestled with self-doubt, frequently revising his symphonies – but not his Sixth. He called the unconventional work with the eerie Scherzo, not without seriousness, his “cheekiest”. It will be conducted by John Storgårds, who makes his debut with the orchestra. Before the symphony, Matthew McDonald, 1st principal bass of the Philharmoniker, presents a world premiere: Gerald Barry describes his concerto for double bass as a dreamlike scene.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    John Storgårds

    Matthew McDonald

    • Carl Nielsen
      Helios, overture, op. 17

    • Gerald Barry
      Concerto for Double Bass and Orchestra, commissioned by the Berliner Philharmoniker Foundation (premiere)

      Matthew McDonald double bass

    • Anton Bruckner
      Symphony No. 6 in A major

    John Storgårds conducts Bruckner’s Sixth and a world premiere Go to concert
  • Kirill Petrenko conducts Schulhoff, Sinigaglia and Zemlinsky

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Schulhoff, Sinigaglia and Zemlinsky

    Photo: Stephan Rabold

    Under this season’s theme “Lost Generation”, Kirill Petrenko devotes this concert to three Jewish composers who suffered anti-Semitic persecution during the Nazi regime. Erwin Schulhoff’s Second Symphony fascinates in its playing with styles such as jazz. Two works full of Italian temperament by Leone Sinigaglia will be heard, with concertmaster Noah Bendix-Balgley. The concert closes with Alexander Zemlinsky’s Lyric Symphony, with Lise Davidsen and Christian Gerhaher.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    Noah Bendix-Balgley, Lise Davidsen, Christian Gerhaher

    • Erwin Schulhoff
      Symphony No. 2

    • Leone Sinigaglia
      Rapsodia piemontese for violin and orchestra, op. 26

      Noah Bendix-Balgley violin

    • Leone Sinigaglia
      Romance for Violin and Orchestra in A major, op. 29

      Noah Bendix-Balgley violin

    • Alexander Zemlinsky
      Lyric Symphony, op. 18

      Lise Davidsen soprano, Christian Gerhaher baritone

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Schulhoff, Sinigaglia and Zemlinsky Go to concert
  • Sakari Oramo and Janine Jansen with Sibelius’s Violin Concerto

    Sakari Oramo and Janine Jansen with Sibelius’s Violin Concerto

    Photo: Benjamin Ealovega

    Violinist Janine Jansen is able to bring out the subtlest nuances of a work with focussed playing. This skill is ideally suited to the demands of Jean Sibelius’s Violin Concerto, with its delicate melodic lines. The Berliner Philharmoniker also play the First Symphony by the Danish composer Rued Langgaard – a late Romantic rarity, which the orchestra premiered in 1913. The conductor of this performance is Sakari Oramo.

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    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Sakari Oramo

    Janine Jansen

    • Jean Sibelius
      Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in D minor, op. 47

      Janine Jansen violin

    • Rued Langgaard
      Symphony No. 1 “Cliffside Pastoral”

    Sakari Oramo and Janine Jansen with Sibelius’s Violin Concerto Go to concert
  • Kirill Petrenko and Daniil Trifonov at the Waldbühne

    Kirill Petrenko and Daniil Trifonov at the Waldbühne

    Photo: Dario Acosta

    The Berliner Philharmoniker and Kirill Petrenko end the season in the Waldbühne with vivid Russian colours. Sergei Rachmaninov’s Second Piano Concerto is both yearning and rebellious. Star pianist Daniil Trifonov is the perfect interpreter to bring out both the virtuosity and delicacy of this music. We will also hear Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition, during which scenes of tremendous force and richness unfold in quick succession.

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    From the Berlin Waldbühne

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    Daniil Trifonov

    • Anatoly Lyadov
      Kikimora, op. 63

    • Sergei Rachmaninov
      Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 2 in C minor, op. 18

      Daniil Trifonov piano

    • Modest Mussorgsky
      Pictures at an Exhibition (orch. Maurice Ravel)

    Kirill Petrenko and Daniil Trifonov at the Waldbühne Go to concert