Live concerts

  • “The Golden Twenties”: Christian Thielemann conducts Hindemith, Strauss und Busoni

    “The Golden Twenties”: Christian Thielemann conducts Hindemith, Strauss und Busoni

    Photo: Stephan Rabold

    Christian Thielemann presents three contrasting musical worlds during our online festival “The Golden Twenties”: that of Paul Hindemith, who brilliantly combined his music with jazz elements in his parodistic opera Neues vom Tage (News of the Day), that of Ferruccio Busoni, the bridge builder between Romanticism and Modernism, and the musical world of Richard Strauss, who cultivated a rich late Romantic musical language in his orchestral songs and the cycle Die Tageszeiten (The Times of Day).

    •  

    Online festival: The Golden Twenties

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Christian Thielemann

    Camilla Nylund

    • Paul Hindemith
      Neues vom Tage (News of the Day), Overture from the Opera with Concert Ending

    • Ferruccio Busoni
      Tanz-Walzer for orchestra, op. 53

    • Johann Strauss II
      Künstlerleben, Waltz, op. 316

    • Richard Strauss
      Das Rosenband, op. 36 No. 1 (version for voice and orchestra)

      Camilla Nylund soprano

    • Richard Strauss
      Ständchen, op. 17 No. 2 (version for voice and orchestra)

      Camilla Nylund soprano

    • Richard Strauss
      Freundliche Vision, op. 48 No. 1 (version for voice and orchestra)

      Camilla Nylund soprano

    • Richard Strauss
      Wiegenlied, op. 41 No. 1 (version for voice and orchestra)

      Camilla Nylund soprano

    • Richard Strauss
      Allerseelen, op. 10 No. 8 (version for voice and orchestra)

      Camilla Nylund soprano

    • Richard Strauss
      Zueignung, op. 10 No. 1 (version for voice and orchestra)

      Camilla Nylund soprano

    • Richard Strauss
      Morgen, op. 27 No. 4 (version for voice and orchestra)

      Camilla Nylund soprano

    • Richard Strauss
      Die Tageszeiten, song cycle for male choir and orchestra, op. 76

      Rundfunkchor Berlin

    “The Golden Twenties”: Christian Thielemann conducts Hindemith, Strauss und Busoni Go to concert
  • Repeat: “The Golden Twenties”: Christian Thielemann conducts Hindemith, Strauss und Busoni

    Repeat: “The Golden Twenties”: Christian Thielemann conducts Hindemith, Strauss und Busoni

    Photo: Stephan Rabold

    Christian Thielemann presents three contrasting musical worlds during our online festival “The Golden Twenties”: that of Paul Hindemith, who brilliantly combined his music with jazz elements in his parodistic opera Neues vom Tage (News of the Day), that of Ferruccio Busoni, the bridge builder between Romanticism and Modernism, and the musical world of Richard Strauss, who cultivated a rich late Romantic musical language in his orchestral songs and the cycle Die Tageszeiten (The Times of Day).

    •  

    Online festival: The Golden Twenties

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Christian Thielemann

    Camilla Nylund

    • Paul Hindemith
      Neues vom Tage (News of the Day), Overture from the Opera with Concert Ending

    • Ferruccio Busoni
      Tanz-Walzer for orchestra, op. 53

    • Johann Strauss II
      Künstlerleben, Waltz, op. 316

    • Richard Strauss
      Ständchen, op. 17 No. 2 (version for voice and orchestra)

      Camilla Nylund soprano

    • Richard Strauss
      Freundliche Vision, op. 48 No. 1 (version for voice and orchestra)

      Camilla Nylund soprano

    • Richard Strauss
      Wiegenlied, op. 41 No. 1 (version for voice and orchestra)

      Camilla Nylund soprano

    • Richard Strauss
      Allerseelen, op. 10 No. 8 (version for voice and orchestra)

      Camilla Nylund soprano

    • Richard Strauss
      Zueignung, op. 10 No. 1 (version for voice and orchestra)

      Camilla Nylund soprano

    • Richard Strauss
      Morgen, op. 27 No. 4 (version for voice and orchestra)

      Camilla Nylund soprano

    • Richard Strauss
      Die Tageszeiten, song cycle for male choir and orchestra, op. 76

      Rundfunkchor Berlin

    • Interview
      During the intermission: Christian Thielemann in conversation with Oliver Hilmes

    Repeat: “The Golden Twenties”: Christian Thielemann conducts Hindemith, Strauss und Busoni Go to concert
  • Paavo Järvi and Igor Levit perform Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 5

    Paavo Järvi and Igor Levit perform Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 5

    Photo: Felix Broede

    Igor Levit describes Beethoven’s radiant E flat major concerto as a work that “makes you really happy”. Following Levit’s debut with the orchestra at the 2015 Easter Festival in Baden-Baden, he now appears for the first time with the Berliner Philharmoniker at the Philharmonie Berlin under the baton of Paavo Järvi. Another item on the programme is Prokofiev’s Symphony in E flat minor. Its opus number – a reference to Beethoven’s Piano Sonata op. 111 – reflects Prokofiev’s admiration for the First Viennese School composer.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Paavo Järvi

    Igor Levit

    • Ludwig van Beethoven
      Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 5 in E flat major, op. 73

      Igor Levit piano

    • Sergei Prokofiev
      Symphony No. 6 in E flat minor, op. 111

    Paavo Järvi and Igor Levit perform Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 5 Go to concert
  • Semyon Bychkov and Lisa Batiashvili perform Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto

    Semyon Bychkov and Lisa Batiashvili perform Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto
    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Semyon Bychkov

    Lisa Batiashvili

    • Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
      Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in D major, op. 35

      Lisa Batiashvili violin

    • Antonín Dvořák
      Symphony No. 7 in D minor, op. 70

    Semyon Bychkov and Lisa Batiashvili perform Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto Go to concert
  • Kirill Petrenko conducts Tchaikovsky’s “Mazeppa”

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Tchaikovsky’s “Mazeppa”

    Photo: Chris Christodoulou

    Like the opera Eugene Onegin, which he composed five years earlier, Pyotr Tchaikovsky’s Mazeppa is also based on a poem by Alexander Pushkin. The work tells the story of the tragic life and loves of a Ukrainian Cossack commander against the background of events during the reign of Peter the Great. After the opera is heard at the Easter Festival in Baden-Baden, the passionate, dramatic score will be brought to life by an outstanding ensemble of singers at the Philharmonie Berlin.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    Vladislav Sulimsky, Olga Peretyatko, Dmitry Ulyanov, Ekaterina Semenchuk

    • Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
      Mazeppa (concert performance)

      Vladislav Sulimsky baritone (Mazeppa), Olga Peretyatko soprano, Dmitry Ulyanov bass (Vasily Kochubey), Ekaterina Semenchuk mezzo-soprano (Lyubov Kochubey), Dmytro Popov tenor (Andrei), Vasily Gorshkov tenor (Iskra), Dimitry Ivashchenko bass (Filipp Orlik),

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Tchaikovsky’s “Mazeppa” Go to concert
  • Zubin Mehta conducts Bruckner’s Ninth Symphony

    Zubin Mehta conducts Bruckner’s Ninth Symphony

    Photo: Sooni Taraporevala

    They belonged to different stylistic periods but nevertheless had a great deal in common: Olivier Messiaen and Anton Bruckner numbered among the leading organists of their day, and both were deeply rooted in the Catholic faith, which considerably influenced their works. Zubin Mehta combines Messiaen’s Et exspecto resurrectionem mortuorum, an impressive musical memorial to the dead of both world wars, with Anton Bruckner’s monumental Ninth Symphony. In this work, Bruckner not only sums up his symphonic oeuvre but also bids farewell to this world in a very personal way.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Zubin Mehta

    • Olivier Messiaen
      Et exspecto resurrectionem mortuorum for wind orchestra and percussion

    • Anton Bruckner
      Symphony No. 9 in D minor

    Zubin Mehta conducts Bruckner’s Ninth Symphony Go to concert
  • Mikko Franck and Yefim Bronfman perform Brahms’s Piano Concerto No. 1

    Mikko Franck and Yefim Bronfman perform Brahms’s Piano Concerto No. 1

    Photo: Dario Acosta

    One would never get the idea that virtuosity could be an end in itself with Yefim Bronfman, who has been a world-class pianist for many years. His artistry is always devoted to the work itself – regardless of whether he launches into a hard-hitting thunderstorm of chords or caresses delicate poetic tableaus out of the keys. “With Brahms I think of natural landscapes, mountains, green valleys and beautiful panoramas, of incredible grandeur,” Bronfman says about the composer, whose First Piano Concerto he plays at these concerts.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Mikko Franck

    Yefim Bronfman

    • Johannes Brahms
      Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 1 in D minor, op. 15

      Yefim Bronfman piano

    • Jean Sibelius
      Symphony No. 5 in E flat major, op. 82

    Mikko Franck and Yefim Bronfman perform Brahms’s Piano Concerto No. 1 Go to concert
  • Kirill Petrenko conducts Mozart and Tchaikovsky

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Mozart and Tchaikovsky

    Photo: LUCERNE FESTIVAL/ Priska Ketterer

    Kirill Petrenko’s interpretation of music by Mozart will be heard together with Tchaikovsky’s Suite No. 3 during this concert, first in Berlin and afterwards at the European Concert. The annual anniversary concert of the Berliner Philharmoniker takes place at the Sagrada Família in Barcelona for the first time in 2021, with a selection of works tailor-made for the sacred location, including the “Coronation” Mass, the Ave verum and the motet “Exsultate, jubilate”. The Catalan choral society Orfeó Català, founded in 1891, makes its debut with the orchestra at these concerts.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    Rosa Feola

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      “Exsultate, jubilate”, motet, K. 165

      Rosa Feola soprano

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      Mass in C major, K. 317 “Coronation”

      Rosa Feola soprano, Wiebke Lehmkuhl contralto, Mauro Peter tenor, Krešimir Stražanac bass-baritone, Orfeó Català

    • Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
      Suite No. 3 in G major, op. 55

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Mozart and Tchaikovsky Go to concert
  • European Concert from Barcelona with Kirill Petrenko

    European Concert from Barcelona with Kirill Petrenko
    •  

    European Concert from Barcelona

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    Kirill Petrenko, Rosa Feola, Wiebke Lehmkuhl, Mauro Peter, Krešimir Stražanac, Orfeó Català

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      Symphony No. 25 in G minor, K. 183

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      “Exsultate, jubilate”, motet, K. 165

      Rosa Feola soprano, Wiebke Lehmkuhl contralto, Mauro Peter tenor, Krešimir Stražanac bass-baritone, Orfeó Català choir

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      “Ave verum corpus”, motet K. 618

      Orfeó Català choir

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      Mass in C major, K. 317 “Coronation”

      Rosa Feola soprano, Wiebke Lehmkuhl contralto, Mauro Peter tenor, Krešimir Stražanac bass-baritone, Orfeó Català choir

    European Concert from Barcelona with Kirill Petrenko Go to concert
  • Kirill Petrenko conducts the BE PHIL Orchestra

    Kirill Petrenko conducts the BE PHIL Orchestra

    Photo: LUCERNE FESTIVAL/ Priska Ketterer

    At 16,000 kilometres, Philipp Eversheim had the longest journey. The flutist from Australia was one of the approximately 90 music-loving amateurs who had qualified to participate in the BE PHIL Orchestra in 2018. This project of the Education Programme gave musicians from 30 countries the unique experience of performing Brahms’s First Symphony under Sir Simon Rattle. A highly emotional event for both the participants and the audience. This season there will be a revival of the BE PHIL Orchestra – with Shostakovich’s Tenth Symphony and chief conductor Kirill Petrenko at the podium.

    •  

    BE PHIL Orchestra
    Kirill Petrenko

    • Dmitri Shostakovich
      Symphony No. 10 in E minor, op. 93

    Kirill Petrenko conducts the BE PHIL Orchestra Go to concert
  • Kirill Petrenko conducts Mahler’s Ninth Symphony

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Mahler’s Ninth Symphony

    Photo: Stephan Rabold

    “Each of Gustav Mahler’s symphonies has a different philosophy, builds a different world,” Kirill Petrenko says in an interview for the Digital Concert Hall. After the Fourth and the Sixth, he now conducts the Ninth, the composer’s last completed symphony, with the Berliner Philharmoniker. A work which makes a radical break with tradition, points the way to modernism and thus pushes open the door to a different world. Mahler conceived the cosmos of this work as fragile, fragmentary and episodic – a grand farewell to youth, love, life.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Kirill Petrenko

    • Gustav Mahler
      Symphony No. 9 in D major

    Kirill Petrenko conducts Mahler’s Ninth Symphony Go to concert
  • Susanna Mälkki conducts “Bluebeard’s Castle”

    Susanna Mälkki conducts “Bluebeard’s Castle”

    It is “a masterpiece, a musical volcano that erupts for sixty minutes of tragic intensity and leaves us with only one desire: to hear it again.” That is how Zoltán Kodály described Béla Bartók’s only opera, Bluebeard’s Castle. Composed in 1911, the one-act work is a brilliantly orchestrated symbolic psychological drama that takes us deep into the emotional world of the fin de siècle. “What do you see?” Bluebeard asks his bride Judith, who wants to open the seven doors of the Duke’s past. Susanna Mälkki conducts this musical psychoanalysis, which makes listeners shudder.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Susanna Mälkki

    Ildikó Komlósi, Johannes Martin Kränzle

    • Kaija Saariaho
      Vista (German première) – commissioned jointly by Berliner Philharmoniker Foundation together with the Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra, the Oslo Philharmonic and the Los Angeles Philharmonic Association (concert performance)

    • Béla Bartók
      Bluebeard’s Castle, Sz 48 (concert performance)

      Ildikó Komlósi mezzo-soprano (Judith), Johannes Martin Kränzle baritone (Bluebeard)

    Susanna Mälkki conducts “Bluebeard’s Castle” Go to concert
  • Simon Rattle conducts Elgar’s “The Dream of Gerontius”

    Simon Rattle conducts Elgar’s “The Dream of Gerontius”

    Sir Simon Rattle returns to the podium of the Berliner Philharmoniker with a major work by his countryman Edward Elgar. The Dream of Gerontius describes the journey of the soul of a dead man on its way to the next world. The work was composed in 1900, one year after Sigmund Freud published his epochal The Interpretation of Dreams. The dream as the gateway to the subconscious. In Elgar’s version, which is deeply indebted to the fin de siècle, the dream appears in the form of a comforting meditation on death.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Sir Simon Rattle

    Dame Sarah Connolly, Allan Clayton, Roderick Williams, Rundfunkchor Berlin

    • Edward Elgar
      The Dream of Gerontius, op. 38

      Dame Sarah Connolly mezzo-soprano, Allan Clayton tenor, Roderick Williams baritone, Rundfunkchor Berlin

    Simon Rattle conducts Elgar’s “The Dream of Gerontius” Go to concert
  • Alan Gilbert conducts Brahms, Chin and Webern

    Alan Gilbert conducts Brahms, Chin and Webern

    The early 20th century was not only influenced by avant-garde concepts but was also characterized by an unbridled passion for intoxicating sounds. Alan Gilbert, chief conductor of the NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchestra, demonstrates that in this programme. We can almost feel the gentle breeze that Anton Webern evokes in his impressionist early work Im Sommerwind (In the Summer Wind). And Arnold Schoenberg clearly took great pleasure in intensifying the colours of Brahms’s Piano Quartet No. 1, drawing on all the orchestra’s resources. Unsuk Chin’s iridescent, sensuous Piano Concerto will be heard between the two works, with Sunwook Kim as soloist.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Alan Gilbert

    Sunwook Kim

    • Anton Webern
      Im Sommerwind, Idyll for large orchestra

    • Unsuk Chin
      Concerto for Piano and Orchestra

      Sunwook Kim piano

    • Johannes Brahms
      Piano Quartet No. 1 in G minor, op. 25 (orchestrated by Arnold Schoenberg)

    Alan Gilbert conducts Brahms, Chin and Webern Go to concert
  • Herbert Blomstedt conducts Sibelius and Brahms

    Herbert Blomstedt conducts Sibelius and Brahms

    “Conducting is a good profession to grow old in, because it’s always a challenge, and you need challenges when you get older,” said Herbert Blomstedt, born in 1927, who is continuing his long-standing collaboration with the Berliner Philharmoniker with undiminished energy and vitality. On this programme Sibelius’s dark, mist-shrouded Fourth Symphony is contrasted with Brahms’s Third. Between them, a rarity will be heard: the solemn Intermezzo from the cantata Sången (The Song), composed in 1926 by the Swedish late Romantic composer Wilhelm Stenhammar.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Herbert Blomstedt

    • Jean Sibelius
      Symphony No. 4 in A minor, op. 63

    • Wilhelm Stenhammar
      Interlude from the Symphonic Cantata Sången, op. 44

    • Johannes Brahms
      Symphony No. 3 in F major, op. 90

    Herbert Blomstedt conducts Sibelius and Brahms Go to concert
  • Jean-Christophe Spinosi and Philippe Jaroussky

    Jean-Christophe Spinosi and Philippe Jaroussky

    Jean-Christophe Spinosi’s artistic home is music of the 17th and 18th centuries. He also appears as an opera conductor, with acclaimed interpretations of works by Mozart and Rossini. For his debut with the Berliner Philharmoniker Spinosi has put together a varied programme including two works from the Baroque period, a symphony from the Viennese Classical School and Romantic bel canto. Philippe Jaroussky is also at home in this repertoire and contributes arias by Vivaldi and Rossini in his brilliant countertenor.

    •  

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Jean-Christophe Spinosi

    Philippe Jaroussky

    • Antonio Vivaldi
      Sinfonia from L'Olimpiade, RV 725

    • Antonio Vivaldi
      Aria “Mentre dormi amor fomenti” from L'Olimpiade, RV 725

      Philippe Jaroussky countertenor

    • Georg Philipp Telemann
      Concerto in E minor for Flute, Recorder, Strings and Continuo, TWV 52:e1

    • Antonio Vivaldi
      Aria “Gemo in un punto e fremo” from L'Olimpiade, RV 725

      Philippe Jaroussky countertenor

    • Joseph Haydn
      Symphony No. 82 in C major “L’Ours”

    • Gioacchino Rossini
      Overture to L’Italiana in Algeri

    • Gioacchino Rossini
      Cavatina “Di tanti palpiti” from Tancredi

      Philippe Jaroussky countertenor

    • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
      Symphony No. 41 in C major, K. 551 “Jupiter”

    Jean-Christophe Spinosi and Philippe Jaroussky Go to concert
  • Concert from the Waldbühne with Martin Grubinger

    Concert from the Waldbühne with Martin Grubinger

    Photo: Simon Pauly

    At his debut with the orchestra in March of 2019 listeners could experience the presence, physicality and enthusiasm with which multi-percussionist Martin Grubinger executed the solo part in Peter Eötvös’s percussion concerto Speaking Drums. He virtuosically elicited a wealth of timbres from his arsenal of instruments – from eruptive cascades of sound to delicate bell tones. At the close of the concert season in the Waldbühne the percussion star returns to the Berliner Philharmoniker: pure rhythm under the stars.

    •  

    From the Berlin Waldbühne

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Wayne Marshall

    Martin Grubinger

    • Leonard Bernstein
      On the Town: 3 Dance Episodes

    • John Williams
      Percussive Planet

      Martin Grubinger drums

    • George Gershwin
      Rhapsody in Blue (orch. Ferde Grofé)

    • Leonard Bernstein
      On the Waterfront, Symphonic Suite

    Concert from the Waldbühne with Martin Grubinger Go to concert